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Barry MacDonnell's
Toolbox for WordPerfect

Macros, tips, and templates for Corel® WordPerfect® for Windows®
© Copyright 1996-2014 by Barry MacDonnell. All Rights Reserved.

Page updated Jul 8, 2014

WordPerfect Tips
Main tips page | Browse tips

Using, creating, modifying, and saving outlines


Page contents -

I. How to use the outline feature

II. How to create new custom outlines (with examples)

III. How to modify existing outlines (or make copies of outlines and modify them)

IV. Alternative and examples of modifying outline styles

Example 1. Put a Tab (or other code) in front of the outline number 

Example 2. Put several (repeating) words or sentences in front of outline numbers

Example 3
. Outline-in-an-outline. Use a counter inside a paragraph style for the first level, and a standard numbered Outline for the second level

Example 4: Create an outline where the second level automatically resets itself

Method A: Modify the outline's number format

Method B: Use a counter in the outline style


Example 5. Create a bullet outline that forces the first word after each bullet to be capitalized

Example 6. Create a numbered outline with duplicate numbers on the right side of the outline's text (or with the numbers on the right side only)


Related pages on this site -

Automatic numbering of paragraphs,  outlines, and lists - Starting, stopping, and toggling the automatic numbering (and bullet) feature - How to quickly turn numbering on and off, promote and demote outline levels, and over 20 other useful tips for using automatic numbering and other Outline styles

Mark a style for inclusion in a Table of Contents (including marking Outline styles)

Automatically numbered document headings

Saving...retrieving...removing custom styles... (outlines are a form of style and can be retrieved from another document or template and inserted into the current document or template)

Create custom bullets for your outlines

Note

The following menu choices refer to the <WordPerfect> menu (right-click on the top menu bar for a choice of menu).

If you use a <Microsoft Word> menu, the choices might be absent from your menu (but not from the program), or they might be found under another menu selection. See here for more.

Tip

If you use automatic paragraph numbering to number paragraphs or items in a list, be sure to read the related page on this site:

    • quickly turn automatic numbering on and off; 
    • promote and demote outline levels;
    • customize numbering styles; and 
    • take advantage of over 20 other useful tips and tricks for using automatic outline numbering and other outline styles. [N.B.: WordPerfect uses outlines in its QuickBullets feature (part of QuickCorrect's Format-As-You-Go) to provide such automatic numbering.]

I. How to use the outline feature

Overview

Outlines are a form of WordPerfect style. They are a great way to organize and structure blocks of text. You can also use this feature to create numbered lists, reports with bulleted sections, and detailed "staircase"-structured manuals. You can easily move items around (up/down) in the outline, place them in order relative to one another (i.e., on a different "level"), and even hide ("collapse") most of the items while you work on one section of the outlined material.

Outlines in WordPerfect can be numbered (e.g., 1., a., i.; 1., 1.1, 1.1.1; I, II, III; etc.) or lettered (A, B, C). The numbers automatically increment at the start of each new paragraph (unless you start a new paragraph with a line break, <Ctrl+Shft+L>, which skips over the auto-numbering process for the following paragraph). If you move items around or add/delete items, the outline automatically renumbers itself. You can even create custom outlines, as explained in the sections below.

Outlines can also be bulleted (•), or they can start with text labels (First, Second, Third). Bullets can be quickly accessed via a button located on the standard (default) toolbar. (The button's icon shows three small squares in vertical orientation, each followed by a horizontal line. There are other ways to insert bullets: see here.)

See also: Automatic paragraph numbering, outlines, and numbered lists - how to quickly turn numbering on and off, promote and demote outline levels, and over 20 other useful tips for using automatic outline numbering.

Starting an outline

To start an outline -- especially in a way that gives you more style options:

  • Click on Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering.
  • In the Bullets & Numbering dialog that appears, choose either the Numbers, Bullets, or Text tab at the top of the dialog.
  • Click on an icon -- a small, simulated page layout -- that represents the type of Outline style you want to use.
  • When you click OK, WordPerfect inserts the outline number, letter, or bullet, (usually) followed by an indent from the left margin.
  • Then just type your paragraph(s).
  • When you press <Enter> a new outline item starts, with a new number (or bullet, or label).

Tips

☼  As soon as a new level starts you can demote (indent) it with the Tab key. [You can also position the cursor at the beginning of text on an outline level and press the <Tab> key.]

☼  
You can promote (outdent) the new level with the <Shft+Tab> keys. [You can also position the cursor at the beginning of text on an outline level and press the <Shift+Tab> key.]

☼  As mentioned above you can use a line break instead of a paragraph break (i.e., the <Enter> key) to continue entering text under the current outline level (the shortcut key for a line break is usually <Ctrl+Shft+L> but it can be reassigned; see here). Look in Reveal Codes to see what happens when you use a line break.

☼  
In addition to the <Tab> and <Shift+Tab> keys, you can use the buttons on the context-sensitive property bar that appears when your cursor is in the outline to promote or demote an outline level. (If the property bar is not visible see here.) The other buttons on that property bar can collapse or expand an outline, show or hide an outline's levels or body text, set a new starting number, etc.

☼  
If you select a block of outlined items, and then choose a new Outline style with Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering, the new outline style will take the place of the old one for the selected text.

☼  
More tips and tricks: See this page for WordPerfect's automatic paragraph numbering which uses one of the Outline styles. Lots of tips there also apply to any Outline style.

Stopping and restarting an outline

  • To stop numbering, simply press the <Backspace> key at the beginning of a new outline level in the current outline -- typically, immediately after you press <Enter> while in the outline.

    • See here for other methods to stop and start outlines by quickly toggling them off/on.
  • You can start (or toggle) a new outline section of the same style, or start one with a different style (with Insert, Outline...), following a previous outline and/or other text in the document.

II. How to create new custom outlines

Outlines are made up of two main parts (using special format codes):

  • An automatic paragraph numbering scheme made up of one or more levels, and
  • a formatting style associated with each level.

These two parts can be seen in Reveal Codes, as a [Para Style] code and a separate [Style] code containing the paragraph numbering scheme and various line formatting (e.g., hard left indent codes).

The first [Para Style] code you see in Reveal Codes is actually one section of a pair of related codes. The second part of the pair, visible after you type some text and press <Enter>, tells WordPerfect to insert a hard return and begin the next outline item on the next line (i.e., in a new paragraph).

WordPerfect takes care of inserting these codes when you use the Outline feature (see above) or the automatic numbering QuickBullets feature (see here).

Here's how to create new customized outlines

[See the section below if you want to modify existing outlines -- standard or customized -- or make modified copies of existing outlines.]

First, you need to set up the outline scheme by specifying whether it should be single level or multi-level, and what type of numbering should be used, such as Paragraph, Legal, Roman, etc.

Then you set up the actual formatting -- the style -- that the outline will take in each of the outline's paragraphs, such as the type of indenting, additional text characters, font, font attributes, etc.

  • Click on Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering, <Numbers tab>, Create. The Create Format dialog will appear. This sets up the new outline numbering scheme.
    • Note: After you click Create you get a message, "Delete [Style]?," then you should Answer "No." This dialog appears when you have enabled (i.e., ticked) the option in Tools, Settings, Environment, Prompts tab, entitled "Confirm deletion of codes...". You might want to exit from the Outline module and disable (un-tick) that option (the WordPerfect default is to have it un-ticked), then start the Create process again. You can always enable it later after the new Outline is created. [Thanks to Kenneth Hobson for this tip.]
  • In the "List name:" field of the Create Format dialog, enter the name of your new outline scheme. (Names are limited to 12 alphanumeric characters.) Add an optional description in the Description field. The name and description will appear in the Bullets & Numbering dialog when the outline style is selected by clicking on its graphic image (i.e., its icon).
  • For "List Type:" choose between -
    • "Single level list" for numbers that will contain just one level (e.g., a normal list numbers such as 1,2,3, etc.; fixed-width numbered paragraphs such as 001, 002, etc.; or bulleted lists), or choose
    • "Multi-level list" for a typical outline style (e.g., 1, a, I, etc.)
  • For "Display:" leave both boxes (Numbers and Styles) enabled (i.e., ticked), which are the default values. The second box causes the paragraph [Style] codes to both display in Reveal Codes when you are in the main document screen and also affect the format for each outline level (i.e., the level's paragraph style). Double-click this style later to instantly change the formatting for all instances of the level you are in at the time. (Such customization of outline styles can be saved later, as described below.)
  • In the "Leading zeros" drop list, choose the number of leading zeros (if any).
  • In the "Text before:" field, you can enter a word or short phrase to precede the outline number (e.g., Article, Section, Chapter, etc.).
    • [See also the "Contents" pane in the Styles Editor (discussed below), where you can add text, tabs, indents, and so forth, before or after the outline number.]
  • In the "Number/Bullet" drop list, choose "1." (or "1" without the period/full-stop for fixed-width numbering), or other number or bullet for each Level in the "Style" list on the right.
  • In the "Style" drop list, choose "Level 1" for single level lists, or accept the default levels for multi-level lists.
  • Click Create Style. The Styles Editor dialog will appear. This sets up the formatting -- or style -- of the outline paragraph (how it will be indented in the document, etc.).
  • In the Styles Editor, give the new format style a name and a description. The name can be similar (but not identical) to the one you gave to the outline scheme in the "List name" field (explained above).
  • The "Enter key inserts style:" field should be set to <Same Style>.
  • The "Type" should be set to Paragraph.
  • In the "Contents:" pane, you will see some default codes. You can usually delete any codes surrounding or following the [Para Num] code (such as the default [Hd Left Ind] code that follows the [Para Num] code) and/or insert your own codes using the Insert or Format menu items at the top of the Styles Editor window. Be sure to retain the [Para Num] code, since this contains information about the structure of the outline itself (number of levels, etc.).
    • EXAMPLE 1: You could insert a Tab before the [Para Num] code, or insert a Tab or two (instead of the default hard left indent) after this code.

The former (using a Tab before the [Para Num] code) would create an outline style something like this:

     1. This is paragraph one. It will wrap to the left margin.
     2. This is paragraph two.

The latter (using two Tabs after the [Para Num] code) would create an outline style something like this:

1.          This is paragraph one. It will wrap to the left margin.
2.          This is paragraph two.

    • EXAMPLE 2: You can also add text around the [Para Num] code; for example, you could type brackets to produce numbers like [1], [2], etc., or if you use leading zeros, [0001], [0002], etc.

The would create an outline style something like this:

[0001]     Paragraph one.
[0002]     Paragraph two.

    • EXAMPLE 3: You can also add text labels following (or preceding) the [Para Num] code, with formatting, such as "Section" or "Definition:" (Note: You can add up to about 4,000 text characters in the Contents field. Adding text inside the Styles Editor is one way to create text variables -- identical text inserted in several document locations by inserting a special style -- a feature that was added in WP10.)
  • Click OK twice to return to the Bullets & Numbering dialog.
  • Important: To save this new outline (or any modified outline) into your default template to make it available in all future documents, open the Bullets & Numbering dialog (if it's not open) and click on the modified outline to choose it. Then click Options, Copy, Default template, OK, while still in Bullets & Numbering. Alternatively, before creating the outline style, click on Settings (or Setup), and "Save to default template." [You can also retrieve custom outline styles later into the current document or template.]
  • You can now select this this outline from the Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering menu selection by clicking on its icon. You can toggle it on and off in the document with a shortcut key.

Tips

  • You can apply font attributes (Bold, Italics, Redline, Small CAPS, etc.), relative sizes (Large, Small, etc.), and/or Fonts (Arial, Copperplate, Technical, etc.) to the outline level's style.
    • This is done in a similar manner to the method used to "Mark a style for inclusion in a Table of Contents":

      (1) Just double-click the [Style] code in an outline level to modify the style's Contents field;
      (2) select the code(s) in the Contents pane (this is often more easily done with Shift+arrow);
      (3) use the Styles Editor's toolbar or menu to apply a font property to the selection, then click OK to return to the document.

  • See also Automatically numbered document headings (i.e., automatically numbered or lettered heading styles).

  • See also Saving...retrieving...removing custom styles... (outlines are a form of style and can be retrieved in several ways from another document or template and inserted into the current document or template).

  • Setting a preferred outline style as the first one in the Bullets & Numbering dialog:

    Normally, the first outline in the Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering list is the Paragraph style of outline (1. a. i., etc.). You can make another outline appear as the first one in the list using a tip from 'Limozine' at WordPerfect Universe here (and also in Footnote 2).

III. How to modify existing outlines
(or make copies of existing outlines and modify them)

Some tips on modifying outline styles

☼  Save or retrieve an outline style:

If you intend to use a newly created ("custom") outline or a modified standard outline later with new documents, you will need to copy it to your default (or other) template, or retrieve it from another document, template, or disk file.

This is explained in Method B, Step 9, below; however, you should perform the previous steps first.

☼  If you wish to create a modified version of a standard outline style:

It is always a good idea to first make a copy of an outline style (or anything else you want to modify), saving it with a different name, then modify the copy (not the original).

This is especially true in an organization with many users who might share documents, and where another user's style with the same name could overwrite your own custom style.

To make a copy before you begin making modifications, use the Options button on the Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering dialog. You can make a copy just for the current document, then if all goes well, you can save a copy to the default template.

☼  Resetting (restoring) outlines to the factory default:

If you modified a standard (i.e., WordPerfect factory shipped) outline style, you should be able to restore that outline style to its default settings with Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering, Options button, Reset. (N.B.: These choices are on the <WordPerfect Menu>, not a <MS Word> menu.)

☼  See also the Tips in the previous section.

Minor changes

For example, you could add a short string of text before the outline's number to produce outline numbering like "Chapter 1" or "Paragraph 1".

For such minor changes to an existing outline's appearance in the current document you can click the Modify button on the Outline Property Bar that appears when your cursor is inside an outline. (This assumes that the View, Toolbars, Property Bar option is enabled (ticked). For more on toolbars and property bars, see here.)

More extensive and/or more permanent changes

For example, you could modify paragraph spacing between outline items, or change font formatting.

You can also save the changes to the outline style for future use in other documents.

Method A: Brief modification method for outline styles in the current document.

[Advanced level users might prefer this method for many "on the fly" modifications in the current document. Use Method B to save a modified version for both the current document and for future use in other documents.]

Step 1:

Double-click
on the outline's [Style] code in Reveal Codes; this opens the Styles Editor for more precise, direct editing of the outline style for that level.

Step 2.:

Make your changes in the Contents pane and close the dialog with OK.

Tips

• 
Be sure to review the short section above about outline format codes. It is helpful to know how WordPerfect creates outlines if you decide to modify them.

•  See also the "Alternatives and Examples" section below if you want to add or delete tabs or indents, or put several (repeating) words or sentences in front of outline numbers.

•  Sometimes it is easier to start from scratch. See the Tips section in "How to Create New Custom Outlines" above.

Method B: Step-by-step modification method to modify outline styles in the current document and (optionally) save them for future use in other documents.

Step 1:

Click on Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering, Numbers tab (or Bullets or Text tabs).

Step 2:

Select an existing outline (numbers, letters, bullets, etc.) by clicking on its graphical (icon) representation in the dialog's window with your mouse.

Then either -

Step 2(a): Click the Edit button to directly modify the chosen outline for the current document only

- or -

Step 2(b): To make the modified outline style available in the current and future documents:

•  Click the Options button, and then click on Copy to make a copy of this outline, so you can edit it to make a brand-new outline. The Outline Definition Copy dialog opens.

•  Click OK to accept the default radio button choice ("Current Document") to save your future modifications (which you'll make further down in these instructions) just to the current document (you'll save them to the default template later). The Outline Definition Duplicate dialog opens.

•  Give the copied style a name (perhaps similar to the original), then press OK.

¤  The new outline style will be added to the icons.

¤  Its graphic (icon) representation should already be selected; if not, select it now, then click Edit.

(Step 2 continued:) The Create Format dialog will appear. This sets up the general outline numbering scheme. Since you are modifying an outline that already has a name, the name and description fields will be grayed out.

Step 3:

For the "List Type," choose either one of these two radio-button choices:

(•) "Single level list" for outline styles that contain just one level -- e.g., a normal list of numbers such as 1.,2.,3. (or I, II, III or First, Second, Third), etc.; or fixed-width numbered paragraphs such as 001, 002, 003, etc.; or bulleted lists), [For one-level outlines, you should not change the type to "Multi-level list".]

- or -

(•) "Multi-level list" for a typical outline style (e.g., 1, a, I, etc.). [Some outline styles, such as Bullets, in some versions of WordPerfect might default to the "Single level list"; simply click the other radio button.]

Step 4:

In the largest field in the dialog, click on the outline level(s) you want to modify to select it.

•  In the "Text before:" field (above the list of outline levels) you can delete the current contents and/or enter a word or short phrase to precede the actual outline number or letter (e.g., Article, Section, Chapter, etc.), or you can enter (or replace) a symbol such as a bullet (by pressing <Ctrl+W>, select the symbol, then press Insert and Close).

•  See also the "Contents" pane in the Styles Editor (discussed below), if you need to add tabs, indents, etc., before or after the outline number.

Step 5:

In the "Number/Bullet" drop list (above the list of outline levels), modify the level's number as desired.

For example, if you are modifying an existing Legal number outline, you could use 1, 1.1, (a), and (1) for the first four levels; or if you are modifying the standard Roman numeral outline, you could use I. and I.A for the first two levels (assuming a multi-level Roman numeral outline). Just put the cursor in the "Number/Bullet" field and type (for example) an "A" character after the "I." characters.

Single-level outlines can be modified in the same way.

Note the Number/Bullet drop list contains a special option at the end: "More". Click it and you can insert other symbols.

If you are modifying a Bullet outline or other single-level outline, you can now skip to Step 7.

Step 6:


Then do either one of these two steps for each outline level:

Step 6(a): In the "Style" drop list, choose an existing style for the currently selected level (or just accept the existing styles),

- or -

Step 6(b): Click the Create Style button to modify the currently selected level's style. The Styles Editor dialog will appear. The Contents pane in this dialog sets up the formatting -- or style -- of the outline paragraph (how it will be indented in the document, etc.).

•  In the Styles Editor, give the new format style a name and a description -- probably the same or similar name you gave to the outline scheme. For example, if you are modifying a copy of the Roman outline that you have named Roman2, and the currently selected level is #3, you could use a name like Rom2Lev3. This makes the new style easier to identify in a styles list. (Incidentally, you must give each new style a name.)

•  The "Enter key inserts style:" field should generally be set to <Same Style> or to whatever setting the original used.

•  The "Type" should generally be set to Paragraph or to whatever setting the original used.

•  In the "Contents:" pane, you will see some default formatting codes.

¤  If desired, you can usually delete any codes surrounding or following the [Para Num] code, such as the default [Hd Left Ind] code that follows the [Para Num] code (this code is responsible for indenting the entire paragraph from the margin by one tab stop; to wrap to the left margin, some users replace it with a Tab using Insert, Tab on the Styles Editor menu).

¤  You can also insert your own codes using the Insert or Format menu items at the top of the Styles Editor window.

¤  You can also add text labels following (or preceding) the [Para Num] code, with formatting, such as "Section" or "Definition:"

Note

Be sure to retain the [Para Num] code, since this contains information about the structure of the outline itself (the number of levels, etc.).

[See both Examples
and Tips in the "How to Create New Outlines" section above.]

Tip

The checkbox at the bottom of the Styles Editor, "Show 'off' codes," can be used to set formatting that follows the level's numbering. See it used in some examples below and also in customizing other styles here and here. [Brief explanation: When ticked, it causes a long code ([Codes to the left...]) to appear in the Contents pane -- a type of "placeholder" that you can either directly select in that pane with Shift+arrow and apply paired-code formatting to the selected code so as to format the following material, or you can just insert single-code formatting (e.g., a font code, hard return code, etc.) after it so as to format the following material. See the aforementioned examples to give you some ideas on how to use it.]


Step 7:


Click OK to return to the Bullets & Numbering dialog, then OK again to return to the main document screen.

Step 8:

Test the outline in your document.

Do not close the document without saving it until you have read the next step.

Step 9. IMPORTANT:

•  To save this new outline in your default template to make it available in all future documents, select the newly modified outline with Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering. Then click Options, Copy, Default template (answer Yes to "Overwrite...?"), OK.

If you do not do this the modified outline will be available (saved) in the current document only.

[Tip: You can also retrieve custom outline styles -- like any other custom mstyle -- into your current document or a template. See here.]

•  To remove or edit this new outline in the future, simply edit your default template as explained here and delete it from the Bullets & Numbering dialog.

Step 10:

If you haven't already started it, you can now choose this outline style from the Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering dialog by clicking on its icon, then clicking OK.

Remember:
Unless you save it (Step 9) it will not be available in other documents.

Tip: You can easily toggle it on and off in the document with a shortcut key.

IV. Alternatives and examples of modifying outline styles

Example 1. Put a Tab (or other code) in front of the outline number, letter, or bullet


Here's an (annotated) alternative from "Robin" at WordPerfect Universe (Jan 26, 2004).

Notes

This procedure will modify the outline for the current document only. However, if you find this technique helpful you can copy the modified outline to your default template.

To save this outline in your default template to make it available in all future documents, open Bullets & Numbering, choose the outline, and click Options, Copy, Default template, OK.

Method

"You can edit any of the available outlines to display the paragraphs the way you want. Here are some step-by-step instructions [to produce an outline similar to the first example above on this web page, in "How to Create New Outlines"]:

1. Pick and insert an outline. [Insert, Outline/Bullets & Numbering.]

2. Open up Reveal Codes (Alt + F3).

3. Double-click on the [Style] code next to the paragraph number.

4. In the Styles Editor that comes up, click in front of the first code. (The cursor shows as a red bar.)

5. Go to Insert on the Styles Editor's top menu and click Tab (at the bottom of the list). That will put a left tab in front of your numbers (or bullets). Or you can put (e.g.) a left indent there with Format, Paragraph, Indent.

6. Still in the Styles Editor, place your cursor all the way to the right and backspace to delete any indent codes, if any.

[Note: Do not delete the long code, "Codes to the left are ON, codes to the right are OFF."]

You [might] want to place a left tab [or space character] after your paragraph number code. So go back to Insert, Tab and add [it] after the codes.

7. OK out."

Tips

  • To save the Outline style for future use you can save it into your default template. See Notes above.

  • Instead of (or in addition to) a Tab or Indent code, you can insert format codes such as [Bold] or [Large] from the Styles Editor menu or property bar. Since the outline is a paragraph style, the format will apply to all words you type until you stop the outline or apply a new sub-level that does not contain these format codes. See also the Tips in "How to Create New Outline Styles," above.

  • If you use this type of outline for section headings, and if the text you enter after the paragraph number is reasonably short, you can also mark these outline entries for inclusion in a Table of Contents.

  • Note that deleting the [Para Num] code in the Styles Editor's Contents pane will delete the visible numbering from that outline level (in the current document). This might be desirable in certain situations, but since it will produce an effect similar to just inserting hard left indents or tabs, you should work with Reveal Codes open so you can see what codes exist at the cursor location.

Example 2. Put several (repeating) words or sentences in front of outline numbers


Here's an outline style posted by this author on 04/08/2004 on WordPerfect Universe in the Tips forum, here.

It puts the same (static) bolded and underlined words in front of all the outline's numbers at that outline level. You can literally put several thousand words in front of an outline number this way, but most likely you would use it where adding preceding text via the Modify button on the Outline property bar (limited to 20 characters) is not enough, or where you need additional formatting (bold, etc.).

Method

"... WP users may not know that any WordPerfect for Windows outline can be easily modified to add text characters to the outline's paragraph style to produce a static text phrase along with the automatic numbering of the item -- such as the examples given in the ... MicroLaw site [here], "Response to Interrogatory No. 1:" ... Here's how to do it (at least for WPWin8 and later versions):

1. Start an outline. For example, if you want to use one of the default (1,2,3,...) outline numbering styles, click on Insert, Outline/Bullets&Numbering. Under the Numbers tab, choose "Paragraph" or "Legal," etc. Click OK to insert the first outline item in the document. (Tip: Instead of using Insert,..., etc., use whatever outline toggle key or macro that you normally use to start the WP default outline/list numbering.)

2. Next, open Reveal Codes and double-click on the [Style] code in that outline item. This brings up the Styles Editor, where you can enter text characters in the Contents field, just in front of and just after the [Para Num] code.

3. For example, the Contents field for your outline level could look something like this:

Response to Interrogatory No. [Para Num: 1...]:[Hd Left Ind][Codes...]

Note the colon (:) between the paragraph numbering code and the indent code.

When you use this modified outline it will produce numbered items like this:

Response to Interrogatory No. 1: Yada, yada...
Response to Interrogatory No. 2: More yada, yada...
Response to Interrogatory No. 3: Even more yada, yada...
etc.

Each time you press <Enter>, a new item is entered in the document, automatically numbered.

4. To make the items bold and underlined, click on the "Show 'Off' codes" checkbox in the Styles Editor to enable that option. Then simply place the cursor before (i.e., to the left of) all text and codes in the Styles Editor's Contents field, hold down the <Shift> key, and use the <RightArrow> key to select everything you want bolded and underlined -- including the [Para Num] code, but do not include the [Hd Left Ind] code or the [Codes to the left...] code. Click the B and U buttons on the menu, then click OK when done. You should get something like this in your document:

Response to Interrogatory No. 1: Yada, yada...
Response to Interrogatory No. 2: More yada, yada...
Response to Interrogatory No. 3: Even more yada, yada...
etc.

The same method can be used to apply a different color, font, font size, or other font attributes (Large, Small, Redline, Small Caps, etc.).

5. Changes to the outline will only be available in the current document.

However, if you find this technique helpful you can copy the modified outline to your default template.

To save this outline in your default template to make it available in all future documents, open Bullets & Numbering, choose the outline, and click Options, Copy, Default template, OK.

Better yet -- create a new single-level outline style in your default template so that it is available whenever needed. See WP's online Help (<F1> key) index, under "outline(s)" for more information...."

Tip

For an alternative approach (using an "Interrogatory...Response" example above) see "Use text and counters with a QuickWord" on the main QuickWords page.


Example 3. Outline-in-an-outline. Create an outline where the first and second levels are numbered separately and continuously throughout the document, and automatically reset themselves if items are added, deleted, or moved


This effect is accomplished by using a WordPerfect counter inside a paragraph Heading style -- a Style-plus-counter -- for the first level, and using a standard numbered Outline for the second and lower levels. [Thanks to Maggie Holman in a thread at WordPerfect Universe for this tip.]

The format will look something like this (bold added to emphasize sequential lettering and numbering):

Section A: (First level using a Style+counter)
  1. Subsection (Second level using Outline)
  2. Subsection (Second level using Outline)
  3. Subsection (Second level using Outline)

Section B: (First level - same Style+counter)
  4. Subsection (Second level - same Outline)
    a. Sub-subsection (Third level - same Outline)
    b. Sub-subsection (Third level - same Outline)
  5. Subsection (Second level - same Outline)

Section C: (First level - same Style+counter)
  6. Subsection (Second level - same Outline)
    a. Sub-subsection (Third level - same Outline)
    ... etc.

Notice that, in Section B, the numbers for all Subsections continue the sequence started in Section A, and do not reset to "1" as they otherwise might using a normal Outline for all items.

For the first level (in the above example, this is "Section A," "Section B," etc.) you can create a new paragraph Heading style (or modify a standard Heading style by editing it; see Tips below) and place a single-level counter in it. The counter keeps track of the sequential numbering or lettering.

For the second level (in the above example: "1. Subsection...") you can use WordPerfect's built-in automatic numbering (which is simply a single-level Outline style's numbering feature; however, be aware that any Outline scheme can be used with Insert, Outlines....) The Outline automatically keeps track of the sequential numbering and/or lettering for this level. And if you use a multi-level Outline style, this level can have sub-levels, as demonstrated in the example above ("a. Sub-subsection...").

Notes

Compound style outline levels -- for example, two Styles-with-counters and one Outline style -- can be created with the method below. (See also Footnote 1 for macros to help create them.)

You can also create the opposite: multiple outline levels (e.g., Part, Chapter, Section) using a multi-level Outline style for the major levels, and a Style-plus-counter for the uninterrupted consecutive numbering of (for example) Tips or Examples throughout the document. See the Tips section below.

Here's how to do it.

1. Create the counter first.

Click Insert, Other, Counter, Create. In the Create Counter Definition dialog, give the new counter a name (e.g., Letters). In the "Single level method" field, choose "A,B,C" to use capital letters for the first level of your outline list. Click OK, then Close.

2. Next, create the custom style-with-counter that you want to use for a Heading.

[Most of the following comes from "Including counters in a style" on the Counters page, here.]

Click Format, Styles, Create. Give the style a name (e.g., ABC Heads, NumbHead 1, etc.) and a description. Set the "Enter key..." field to <None> (if you want the cursor to go back to body text when you press Enter), and set the Type to Paragraph.

In the Contents pane, insert the counter you just created in step 1 above. From the Styles Editor menu, click Insert, Other, Counter, and make sure the new counter is selected, then click the "Display in Document" button. Again, click Insert, Other, Counter, and make sure the new counter is selected, but this time click "Increase."

You should now have two codes in the Contents field:

[Count Disp][Count Inc] -- in that order.

The idea is to make WP display the number, then (internally) increment it for any counter number that may follow later in the document.

Add any attributes (Bold, Large, etc.), centering, text or spaces before or after these codes. You can add tabs or indents after the counter codes (on the Editor's menu, click Insert,Tab or Format, Paragraph, Indent). [To mark this style for inclusion in any Table of Contents, see here.]

Click OK, then Close. [You should save this custom style to your default or other template as explained here.]

You should now be back in the main document.

3. Apply the new heading style from the "Select Style" drop list on the property bar (or use Format, Styles). Type some text for this first "outline level." (You can also select text first, then apply the style to the selection.) Press <Enter> to go to the next line, and press <Tab> or insert a Left Indent (<F7> or <F4>), if desired.

4. Choose and apply the numbering outline with Insert, Outline/Bullets... "Numbers 2," or simply press the default shortcut key, <Ctrl+H> (for those who use the DOS keyboard, use <Ctrl+T>). Enter as many items for this second level as desired. As before, press the <Enter> key to "chain" them together. You can use the same shortcut key to turn the outline numbers off.

5. When you need the first "outline level" again -- the new heading style -- repeat Step 3. The letters should increment.

Repeat the process of inserting the custom style and toggling the outline numbers on/off, as needed.

6. (Optional:) Save the new heading style to your default (or other) template so it is available in the future in new documents based on that template. See "Saving custom styles to your default (or other) template."

7. (Optional:) You can use a macro to create the custom Letter heading style with the custom counter embedded in it -- all in one step -- in any document, as needed. You can then play the macro in the document (and even play it just to increment an existing Letter level; if this shortcut is useful, you could assign the macro to a keystroke or toolbar button). See Footnote 1 for the macro code.

Tips

  • You can create custom headings by making copies of existing Heading styles (such as Heading 2) with Format, Styles, <choose the Heading 1 style>, and click Options, Copy, Current document. (You can always copy it to the default template later, after testing it.) Edit the new style and insert the counter codes in it as explained above.
  • Since the Outline numbering used for the second level is separate from the new Style-with-counter used in the first level, you can use any Outline/Bullets scheme for the second level. The numbering mechanisms are independent of each other. Moreover, you can quickly modify the Outline's style (perhaps to add tabs, or format the number in bold) by double clicking on the [Style] code. The [Style] code takes care of general formatting for the Outline's level; the [Para Num] numbering codes inside the [Style] code take care of the Outline's automatic numbering. Conversely:
  • You can use a standard or modified multi-level Outline style, such as the standard "1,A,i" Paragraph Outline style, with a single-level Style-with-counter (e.g., Example #1 ... Example #99) to make use of uninterrupted consecutive numbering for certain levels that are interspersed throughout the document or major part of the document. The Outline would be used to number (for example) Chapters, Sections, Subsections, etc. -- demoting and promoting levels as needed -- and the Style-with-counter would be used to consecutively number all Examples or Tips in the document.
  • If at some point further in the document you need to reset the style-with-counter numbering sequence to the beginning, you can place your cursor just to the left of the level's style codes (or even on a line above the style codes) and click Insert, Other, Counter. Then choose that style's counter (or a custom counter, if used), and click the Value button to reset the sequence to "A" (or "1", "I", "a", etc.).
  • To cross-reference these styles-with-counters, or include them in a Table of Contents, see the TIPS on the Counters page, here.

Example 4. Create an outline where the second level automatically resets itself

A user wanted to create an outline format for chapters and sections of a book that would look like this:

I.      first title

I.A     first subtitle
I.B     second subtitle
I.C     third subtitle

II      second title

II.A      new [first] subtitle *
II.
B      new [second] subtitle

* - "Note that the second [level] needs to be reset just before the ... title. Otherwise, this would become II.D."

Note also that the first level's number (I, II, III, IV, etc.) is carried over as a prefix in the sub-level(s), unlike the standard Paragraph (1,a,i) or Outline (I,A,1) styles that come with WordPerfect.

There are at least two ways to do this. One method modifies the outline's number format, and the other inserts a counter in the outline style's second level. The former method is both easy and recommended; however, the latter method is explained here for those who want to learn how to use counters in styles.

Note that the following methods use the user example outline above, but you can modify them to set up any desired custom outline style.

Method A: Modify the outline's number format.

1. Click on Insert, Outlines/Bullets & Numbering. Click on the Outline style of outline ("I./A./1."), then Options, Copy, (to) Current document. [After testing, you can copy the outline style to the default template while the document is still open).] Click OK and give it a name (e.g., Outline2). Click OK and you are back in the Bullets & Numbering dialog, with the new style's icon selected.

2. Click Edit to edit the new outline. Click the "Multi-level list" radio button.

3. Select (i.e., choose) the second outline level, Level 2, in the bottom pane.

4. Click in the "Number/Bullet" field and enter a "I." before the "A" -- i.e., it should be "I.A"

5. Create additional custom Levels for the outline by repeating steps #3 and #4 for each Level, and -- this is the important part -- adding the previous level numbers to each subsequent level (e.g., Level 3 should be "I.A.1," Level 4 should be "I.A.1.a," etc.). Note that you can use hyphens, parentheses, and even WordPerfect symbols (<Ctrl+W>) in the "Number/Bullet" field.

You can also assign new formatting Styles to the remaining Levels by picking them from the Styles drop list in the Create Format dialog. Normally, the Level 1-8 styles insert a consecutive number of indents before the paragraph outline number and a single indent after it (to separate the number from the body of the paragraph). The Legal 1-8 styles do not insert any preceding indents; this causes all the outline numbers to be flush left with the margin.

6. If everything works as expected, and while the current document with the new outline is still open, copy the new outline to your default template: Select the new Outline2 outline's icon, then click Options, Copy, Default template, OK. The new outline should appear in any new document in the Number icon list of the Bullets & Numbering dialog.

Method B: Use a counter in the Outline style. 

To create the outline style in the example at the top of this section, the basic idea is to create a new Roman numeral outline where the first level resets the second level's style each time the first level is used.

First, make sure you have created one, new single-level counter:

Click Insert, Other, Counter, Create. Give the new counter a name (e.g., "Title lettering"), and use "A,B,C,..." for the method. Click OK, then Close. (You'll set the Value later.)

Next, create a new outline:

1. Click on Insert, Outlines/Bullets & Numbering. Click on the Roman outline style ("I./II./III."), then Options, Copy, (to) Current document. [After testing, you can copy the outline style to the default template while the document is still open).] Click OK and give it a name (e.g., Roman2). Click OK and you are back in the Bullets & Numbering dialog, with the new style's icon selected.

2. Click Edit to edit the new outline. Click the "Multi-level list" radio button. (The first level -- Level 1 -- of the outline should be selected at this time.) Click the Create Style button to bring up the Styles Editor so that you can modify Level 1. Give the new style a name (e.g., Roman2 Lev1) and optional description. You can click "Automatically update..." If desired.

3. Put the cursor in the Contents field -- *after* all other codes. Click Insert, Other, Counter and choose your new counter ("Title lettering"). Click the Value button; the Numbering Method should be "A,B,C.." and the Value should be "A." Click OK. You will see the Value become "0" (zero). Click Close. You should see two new codes in the Contents field: [Count Meth][Count Set]. Click OK to exit from the Styles Editor and return to the Create Format dialog.

4. Select Level 2. In the "Number/Bullet" field, enter an "A" after the "1." -- I.e., it should be "1.A"

OPTIONAL: Add a period / full stop after the "A" or enclose the "A" in parentheses, if desired. Create additional custom Levels for the outline by repeating this step for each Level. You can also assign new formatting Styles to the remaining Levels by picking them from the Styles drop list in the Create Format dialog.

5. Click OK to exit from the Create Format dialog. The new outline should be selected, so just click OK to return to the document and begin the new outline.

If everything works as expected, and while the current document with the new outline is still open, copy the new outline to your default template:

6. Select the new Roman2 outline's icon, then click Options, Copy, Default template, OK. The new outline should appear at the bottom of the icon list in any new document.

Example 5. Create a bullet outline that forces the first word after each bullet to be capitalized


While this technique seems complicated, it is not. But it is a trick in that it uses a "hidden" period character.

And if you like the result you can save the new Outline style for future use (see last paragraph, "Re-using the new Outline style"), which means you need only create it once.

Method

1. First, click Tools > QuickCorrect > Format-As-You-Go, and check (enable) "Capitalize next letter after end-of-sentence punctuation." Click OK to exit that dialog. This is a "sticky" setting between WordPerfect sessions.

Then -

2. Create a copy of a bullet outline with Insert > Outline/Bullets & Numbering > Bullets (tab) > (left-click on your desired bullet outline in that window) > Options (button) > Copy.

[Note: On the next small dialog (Outline Definition Copy), I suggest you choose "Current document" so it will apply to just the current document. You can always copy (i.e., save) the new Outline style to your default template later (see last paragraph).]

2. Give the new Outline style a name (e.g., "Bullets 2"). Click OK. The new bullet outline style should now be selected at the bottom of that dialog window.

3. Next, while still in that dialog, click the Edit button to open the Create Format dialog for that outline style.

4. Click on the Create Style button at the bottom of that dialog. The Styles Editor opens. Give the Level style a name (e.g., “Cap Next”.)

In the Editor’s Contents pane you will see two codes:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind]

5. Place your cursor (a red rectangular block) between these two codes. Press the period key to insert a period character.

6. Next, hide the period by first placing the cursor to the left of the period character and -- using the menu on the Styles Editor dialog -- click Format > Font. Choose the white color (i.e., your paper color) from the color palette. Click OK. A [Color] code should appear in the Contents pane. Now, move the cursor to the right side of the period and repeat with a black color (i.e., your ink color). Click OK. Another [Color] code should appear.

The Contents pane should now look like this:

[Para Num][Color].[Color][Hd Left Ind]

7. Click OK to dismiss the Styles Editor; click OK to return to the document.

8. Back in the same document, a new bullet should be visible. If not, click Insert > Outline... > Bullets (tab) > (left-click on the new, modified outline if it is not already selected) > OK. This should insert the first bullet.

Test: Type some lower case text, and press Enter. Repeat several times to ensure it is capitalizing the first word of all entries. (If not, check to see if QuickCorrect’s "Capitalize next letter after end-of-sentence punctuation" has been enabled.)

Alternative 

Instead of a white color for the period, you could use the Hidden text attribute applied to the period -- assuming you have de-selected View > Hidden Text so that the period remains hidden.

If you care fully select just the period character in the Styles Editor's Contents pane and then use the Editor's Format > Font > Hidden option, you should get codes like this:

[Para Num][Hidden][Hd Left Ind]

The [Hidden] code includes the space character, and it will not be visible or print if you have de-selected View > Hidden Text. 

Re-using the new Outline style

If you are pleased with the results, you can add (save) this new style to your default template so it will be available in future documents: While in Outline/Bullets & Numbering, click on the new outline style to select it. Then click the Options button and then click Copy, Default template, OK. (To delete it from the default template you will need to edit that template, as explained here.)


Example 6. Create a numbered outline with duplicate numbers on the right side of the outline's text (or with the numbers on the right side only)


This style was suggested by an author of screenplays, but it might work well for long reports or other material where numbers are desirable on the right side of the page to make it easier to thumb through them to find an item.

As with previous examples, if you like the result you can save the new Outline style for future use (see last paragraph, "Re-using the new Outline style"), which means you need only create it once.

Method

1. Create a copy of (e.g.) the Numbers 2 outline style with Insert > Outline/Bullets & Numbering > Numbers (tab) > (left-click on the Numbers 2 outline in that window) > Options (button) > Copy.

[Note: On the next small dialog (Outline Definition Copy), I suggest you choose "Current document" so it will apply to just the current document. You can always copy (i.e., save) the new Outline style to your default template later (see last paragraph).]

2. Give the new Outline style a name (e.g., "Numbers 3"). Click OK. The new outline style should now be selected at the bottom of that dialog window.

Next, while still in that dialog -

3. Optional (but suggested): Change the format of the numbering item in the Number/Bullet field to (e.g.) plain numbers such as "1" or (optionally) with brackets such as "[1]" or some other desired style. (Do not include the quote marks.)

4. Click the Edit button to open the Create Format dialog for that outline style.

5. Click on the Create Style button at the bottom of that dialog. The Styles Editor for the Level opens.

6. Give the Level style a name (e.g., “NumbersDup”.)

In the Editor’s Contents pane you should see two codes:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind]

7. Enable (tick) the box at the bottom of the Editor, "Show 'Off codes'". This inserts a long code:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind][Codes to the left are ON...]

8. Carefully select and copy the [Para Num] to the Windows clipboard code with Ctrl+c. (Selection is easier by placing the cursor to the left of that code in the Contents pane, then using Shift+RightArrow. Then use Ctrl+c to copy the code.) 

9. Place the cursor after (i.e, following) the long [Codes to the left...] code, and paste the copied code there with Ctrl+v.

You should now have two [Para Num] codes in the Contents pane of the Styles Editor:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind][Codes to the left are ON...]
[Para Num]

Some formatting options:

- You can add <spaces> just before (in front of) that newly copied code. This will separate duplicate number from the outline's text. You would then have this:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind][Codes to the left are ON...]
<><>[Para Num]

- Or, you could add a Flush Right code from the Editor's menu (Format> Line> Flush Right). You would then have this:

[Para Num][Hd Left Ind][Codes to the left are ON...]
[Hd Flush Right][Para Num]

- You can add additional formatting such as making the numbers bold. If you first select each [Para Num] code and then click the B icon on the Styles Editor's toolbar, you would have this:

[Bold][Para Num][Bold][Hd Left Ind][Codes to the left are ON...]
[Hd Flush Right][Bold][Para Num][Bold]

- If you delete the first [Para Num] code you can create an outline style where the numbers will be on the right side only of the outline level's text. (This works best for outline levels that use short phrases that do not extend past the right margin -- but you can easily test the result with various text samples.) You might want to remove the hard left indent code, too. You would then have something like this:

[Codes to the left are ON...]
[Hd Flush Right][Para Num]

10. Click OK to dismiss the Styles Editor; click OK again to return to the same document.

Test the new  outline in the same document.

Re-using the new Outline style

If you are pleased with the results, you can add (save) this new style to your default template so it will be available in future documents: While in Outline/Bullets & Numbering, click on the new outline style to select it. Then click the Options button and then click Copy, Default template, OK. (To delete it from the default template you will need to edit that template, as explained here.)

Page Top




Footnote 1

(from Example 3 above)

Counter in a style - a macro approach

Below is a macro that

  • (1) creates a custom counter ("CapLtrCnt"), then it
  • (2) creates a Letter heading style ("CAPS") with the new counter placed inside it to create a style-with-counter.

To copy the macro into WordPerfect, see here.

To test it, open a new blank document and play the macro. You should see "Section A" followed by a tab. Type some paragraph text, press <Enter> and if you don't immediately need the next item in the level (i.e., "Section B"), press <Backspace>. Then use your favorite Outline number style (or just press <Ctrl+H> or <Ctrl+T>) to insert an auto-incrementing number for the second level, as explained above.

Try cutting a section of the outline and pasting it above or below the current location. The letters and numbers should reset themselves to the proper sequence.

You can modify the style in the "Edit the style..." block below (but be sure to leave the two Counter... commands alone). For example, you can replace the Tab() command with a space by using a Type(" ") command, or with a hard left indent by using an Indent() command. The changes will take place in new documents when you play the (saved) macro.

Once a style exists in the current document, open Reveal Codes and simply double-click on any [Style] code for the style. You can then edit the style directly "on the fly." For example, you might want to use something other that "Section" before the counter's letters/numbers/Roman numerals, or use a hard left indent (Format, Paragraph, Indent on the Styles Editor menu) instead of a tab (Insert, Tab) after the heading. (TIP: To include text formatted with these styles in a Table of Contents, see here.)

// Macro code begins. Names for the counter and style are shown
// in color. These can be changed to create copies of this macro
// for different purposes.

// CAPS style.wcm

Application (WordPerfect; "WordPerfect"; Default!)

// Create the counter in the current document -
OnError(NextSegment@) // (if counter already exists, jump down)
CounterCreate (CounterName: "
CapLtrCnt"; Method: UpLetter!)
Label(NextSegment@)

// Create the style (which uses the new counter) in
// the current document -
OnError(NextSegment2@) // (if style already exists, jump down)
StyleCreate (Name: "
CAPS"; Type: ParagraphStyle!; Library: CurrentDoc!)
StyleEditBegin (Style: "
CAPS"; Library: CurrentDoc!)
StyleCodes (State: WithoutOffCodes!)
StyleDescription (Description: "
Capital letters with counter")

// Edit the style; enter (optional) text, counter codes,
// (optional) and a tab -
Type (Text: "Section ")
CounterDisplay (CounterName: "
CapLtrCnt"; Level: 1)
CounterIncrement (CounterName: "
CapLtrCnt"; Level: 1)
PosLineEnd ()
Tab ()

// Exit from the Styles Editor -
SubstructureExit ()
StyleEditEnd (State: Save!)

Label(NextSegment2@)
// Insert the style in the document -
StyleOn("
CAPS")
// Exit here -
Return

// Macro code ends

Counter in a style - a more general macro approach

Here is another macro you can download that creates five styles-with-counters in the current document similar to the single style created by the macro in the left column. Each has its own unique single-level counter embedded inside the style. (The counters produce numbers, upper- and lowercase letters, and Roman numerals.)

Download FiveStyles.zip (v1.01; 05/16/07, 13,740 bytes)

Downloading, Documentation, Modifications, and Support

NOTE: After downloading and extracting it from the ZIP archive, open the macro like any other document and read the comments at the top, which explain in more detail the macro's operation.

TIP: To include text formatted with these styles in a Table of Contents, see here.

You can use these styles-with-counters whenever needed to automatically number sections of your document (instead of -- or in addition to -- using a standard outline). This gives you the ability to use several different numbering schemes at the same time, each maintaining its own automatic numbering sequence even if interspersed with the others. Each will renumber the sequence automatically if you delete, insert, or move an instance of the style to another location.

Each of the five styles uses one of the counter methods available in WordPerfect:

numbers (1,2,3...)
upper case letters (A,B,C...)
lower case letters (a,b,c...)
upper Roman (I,II,III...)
lower Roman (i.ii.iii...)

By default, each style inserts the label "Section " before each counter (number or letter), then follows the counter with a colon and tab, like this:

Section A:

Just select (i.e., choose) one of the new five styles that appear in the Select Style drop list on the Text property bar (or use Format, Styles). WP will then insert the new paragraph style at the cursor location. Type some text, then press <Enter>. To stop the style, press <Backspace> immediately after <Enter>, or press the right arrow key to skip past the ending paragraph code.

You can then type your body text ... or you can use any Outline style (Insert, Outline....) to interpolate a numbering scheme between the new style's items. Both the new style and the Outline style will independently track their numerical/alphabetical sequences. Hence, you can insert one of the new styles-with-counters in several locations inside a standard Outline, and not disrupt the existing Outline numbering. The style will automatically adjust its own numbers/letters, too. You can move them to different locations, insert new items, or delete items, and the counters will automatically sequence properly.

The styles can be easily edited (Format, Styles or by double clicking the [Style] code when they are applied in a document) to customize them. For example, you might want to use something other that "Section" before the counter's letters/numbers/Roman numerals, or use a hard left indent (Format, Paragraph, Indent on the Styles Editor menu) instead of a tab (Insert, Tab) after the heading. (TIP: To include text formatted with these styles in a Table of Contents, see here.)

See the comments at the top of the macro code about its operation, customization, etc.

If one or more of the same-named styles already exists in the document, no new style of that name will be created. So if you forget and play the macro again, you don't have to worry that it will overwrite your style-with-counter customizations in that document.



Footnote 2
 
[From 'Limozine' at WordPerfect Universe here.]

Here are the steps to change which outline style is first in the Insert>Outline... list on all new documents.

Note:
This method modifies the default template. If you need to do this just for the current document, skip steps 2-5 and 17.

1. Open WP.
2. Click File > New From Project.
3. Select Custom WP Templates from drop-down list.
4. Select Create a Blank Document from choices. [This is the "friendly" name of the default template.]
5. Click Options > Edit WP Template.
6. Click Insert > Outline/Bullets & Numbering
7. Make sure the Numbers tab is selected.
8. Click the first outline in the list.
9. Click the Edit button at the bottom.
10. Click the drop-down list under Based On and select the outline style you want.
11. Click Ok. You should now see your desired outline style as the first in the list.
12. ... You should now see your preferred outline style duplicated in the list. Go to the second occurrence of the duplicate outline style and click it.
13. Click the Edit button at the bottom.
14. Click the drop-down list under Based On and select the outline style that was originally in the first position.
15. Click Ok. The original, default outline style is now where the duplicate style was. Your preferred style and the original have swapped places.
16. Click Ok again to return to the document.
17. [If you are editing the default template (i.e., with steps 2-5 above):] Backspace over the outline [to remove all related codes] you just added to the template. Otherwise, all new documents will start with an outline whether you want them to or not.
18. Save and close.
[If you are editing the default template (steps 2-5, 17 above):] Now your default template has all of the outline styles it started with, but in a different order.