Home | Tips | Library | Other Authors | Other WP Sites | Writer's Links | Contact | Site Map | Donate

Barry MacDonnell's
Toolbox for WordPerfect

Macros, tips, and templates for Corel® WordPerfect® for Windows®
© Copyright 1996-2017 by Barry MacDonnell. All Rights Reserved.

Page updated Feb 20, 2017

WordPerfect Tips
Main tips page | Browse tips

Graphics Tips -

Miscellaneous tips for inserting and using graphic images (clip art, photos, charts, text boxes, etc.) in a WordPerfect document

[For some tips on WordPerfect tables, see here.]

Page Contents (each item is a separate tip, and in no particular order)

☼  Combine images with text: How to add text directly on (or adjacent to) a graphic image so that both the image and the text can be moved (repositioned) together [More...] 

☼  Ceate and save a custom graphic style (figure, line, box border, etc.) with Format, Graphic Styles [More...]

☼  Set your preferred (i.e., your default) graphic box style when inserting images [More...]

☼  Set the size (or other settings) of individual graphic boxes with a macro [More...]

☼  Attaching graphic images:  How to keep a graphic image or text box from "jumping around" on a page or moving to another page - i.e., keep them attached to a specific document location so they don't lose their place when you add or delete material above the graphic. (Plus: how to group images.) [More...]

☼  Cross-reference a box caption (e.g., graphic image with a Figure caption) [More...]

☼  Cross-reference a small movable Table: Put the entire table inside a captioned custom box (which then can be repositioned on the page) [More...]

☼  How to number some graphic box images ("Figure 1," "Figure 2," etc.) but not all images - How to start such image numbering in a document with a different initial value [More...]

☼  How to create a WordPerfect List of graphic or photo captions [More...]

☼  How to install the entire Clip Art catalog on a hard drive [More...]

☼  How to create "sticky notes" in WordPerfect [More...]

☼  How to add your scanned signature to a document [More...]

☼  About graphic images and "file bloat" [More...]

☼  Line up (align) text boxes or other graphics in WP10 and later versions [More...]

☼  Create a page border with repeating graphic images (clip art, photos, etc.) or text images [More...]

☼  Problems inserting graphics into WordPerfect under Windows 2000/XP or later version of Windows? [More...]

☼  Messages about images being greater than 27 inches [More...]

☼  Using boxes to cover up dividing lines between columns [More...]

☼  How to stop specified graphic images from printing [More...]

☼  How to stop all graphics from displaying on screen (but still print) [More...]

☼  Controlling the printing and non-printing of all graphics with a macro [More...]

☼  How to reorder two graphic images so their numbered captions are in the correct sequence [More...]

☼  How to make a text box opaque to underlying material [More...]

☼  How to convert WordPerfect .WPG images to .JPG/.JPEG images [More...]

☼  JPEG images on a Pentium 4 [More...]

☼  Finally: Don't forget to explore WordPerfect's Help Topics (F1 key, then use the Contents tab under "Using graphics...", the Search tab for specific topics like "Captions", etc.) and also theReference Center's User Guide (available through the Help menu; for older program versions the User Guide might be on the installation CD).



Combine images with text: How to add text directly on (or adjacent to) a graphic image so that both the image and the text can be moved (repositioned) together

[Back to top]


Note: These two methods are not the same thing as adding a text caption to an image by right-clicking and image and choosing Caption from the context menu. Captions can appear at certain fixed locations around a graphic image (or a text box), but the methods below allow more flexibility when adding text -- including adding it directly on top of the image itself.

Source: Pascal Couture on OfficeCommunity.com, Jul 12, 2013; modified with additional information and options.

Method A

If the formatting of the desired text is reasonably simple, you can do the following, which adds the text directly on the image's "canvas":

Step 1. Insert the image into WordPerfect using Insert, Graphics/Pictures.

Step 2. Double-click on the inserted image to edit it. [N.B.: This opens the Presentations module (with its own Property Bar and Toolbar Palette) to allow editing the document's image. You can also drag the grab handles on the edges to expand the "canvas" and allow for text to be placed outside the original image area.]

Step 3. From the menu, select Insert, Text Box and click-drag on your image [i.e., open a text input area] to place the first line of the text.

• Pressing <Enter> when entering text will automatically enlarge the text box to fit more lines.
• You can change the font, fill color, etc., using the options on the top Property Bar and side Tool Palette.

Step 4. Click outside the image to stop editing it.

• Using this method the text will be part of the image object so it will move with the image.
You can edit the text at any time by double-clicking on the image, and then double-clicking on the text.
Note: This text will normally be ignored by WordPerfect's writing tools but can be spell checked while being edited.

Method B

If you (1) require more extensive text formatting, or (2) require the text to be spell checked normally by WordPerfect, or (3) require the text to be moved somewhere adjacent to the image (but still remain part of it), then the following method -- which groups both an image and a text box together -- might be more appropriate.

(Tip: See also "Attaching graphic images," and its subsection on grouping images, below.)

Step 1. Insert the image into WordPerfect using Insert, Graphics/Pictures. [If the image box is still selected (selected boxes have 8 small square drag handles around the edges of the box) click outside it to deselect it.]

Step 2. Click on Insert, Text Box from the WordPerfect menu to add a text box on the page.

Step 3. Enter your text in the text box and format it as you'd like. You can drag the edges of the box to resize it around the text.

Step 4. Optional: To remove the text box border, right-click on the box's (hatched) frame and select Border/Fill... from the context menu that appears. Select the <None> border style and click OK.

Step 5. Optional: To let the image show through the text box, right-click on the text box’s frame again and select Wrap, then choose "In front of text"; then click OK.

Step 6. Move (drag) the text box over (or adjacent to) your image to the desired location, and then click outside the text box to stop editing it.

Note: The text may not look very good after doing this [i.e., if placed over some images], but this will not affect printing/PDF output quality.

Step 7. Select your inserted image by clicking on the image.

Step 8. Add your text box to that selection by Shift-clicking (<Shift> + left click) on the text box.

Step 9. Right-click on your still-selected objects and choose Group from the context menu. This step will cause both objects to stick together and behave as one. You can then drag the group as a single unit to relocate it; right-click on it to use various options such as adding a Caption to the group; etc.

Step 10. Click outside the grouped objects to return to the document.

Notes and tips:

• To edit the text box later, select the image (as in Step 7) and then double-click directly on the text. To help you edit or format the text, open Reveal Codes so you can see the results.

• You can “ungroup” the items: Right-click on the grouped objects and select Separate from the context menu. Click outside the objects. You can now drag the image away from the text box (or vice versa).



Create and save a custom graphic style (figure, line, box border, etc.) with Format, Graphic Styles

[Back to top]


[To set your preferred (i.e., your default) graphic box style when inserting images, see the next tip.]


Graphics Styles come in four "flavors" which can be accessed by the four radio buttons on that dialog:

Box,
Border
,
Line
, and
Fill
.


Start with a copy or start from scratch?

• If you select one of these flavors and choose a style from the list, you can then use the Options button to make a copy of an existing style and then modify it instead of making changes to an existing (factory) style -- which, in any case, can always be Reset to the default using the Options button.

- or -

• You can use the Create button to create a new style from scratch (as in examples below).

However, unlike making a change to a factory style, custom styles will only be available in the current document unless -

(a) you save it in a disk file and retrieve it into another document (or template) as discussed below (the preferred method);

- or -

(b) you have previously set
Format, Graphic Styles, Options, Settings to "Default template". (Most users probably want to use "Current document" here, to keep the default template free from stored one-off styles.)

Saving and retrieving custom graphic styles:

When you create a custom graphics style (or modify a copy of a factory style) it will show up in the Format, Graphic Styles dialog in the current document.

[Note: New custom graphic styles will appear along the styles stored in the default template if the "List styles from:" drop list is set to Current Document. If it is set to Default Template, only those styles in that template will be listed.]

Select its name in the list (you might have to scroll down to see it), then click the Options button, then Save As, to save it to a file.

The file should appear in the template folder specified in your Tools, Settings, Files, Template tab, where it can be retrieved later into any document using the Graphic Styles dialog's Options, Retrieve button.

But, as mentioned above, it will only be brought into the current open document. You would have to retrieve it into the default template for it to be available for all new documents. See here for how to modify that template.

[I usually recommend using a .STY filename extension when you save a style file; if you do that you will need to choose "All Files" (as the File Type) when you open the Retrieve Box Styles dialog and Browse to that folder. Otherwise, all you will see in the File Open dialog is a list of template files (.WPT).]

If you modify an existing (factory) graphic style, the modified style will be directly saved in your default template (since that is where factory styles are stored) and it will be available to all documents. You can always reset it to the factory default with the Options, Reset button. However, until you are comfortable with the process it's probably better to either create a new custom style (see examples below) or modify a copy of a factory style, and then retrieve it into your default template when you are sure you will need it in the future.

Note also that border styles are also used for page borders and paragraph borders and will show up in the Page (or Paragraph) Border/Fill dialog's list of "available border styles" when you access that feature from the main Format menu; hence, if you create (or edit) a border style in the Graphic Styles dialog, you can later use it for a page or paragraph border.

The "Border type" drop list on the Page Border/Fill dialog will also let you choose between Line or Fancy page borders. The latter is a limited selection of fancy borders, but there are many more available (in some editions of WordPerfect) on CD#2 in the ClipArt folder: To get them, use Inert, Graphics/Pictures, ClipArt, Borders.... Once inserted, they can be right-clicked to Wrap them Behind Text (or simply inserted into a watermark) and then re-sized and repositioned.


Custom graphic style examples



Example 1:

Setting the default insertion size of graphic images.

See this (flash) animation by Roy "lemoto" Lewis (Corel C_Tech), here which demonstrates the following steps to set the initial insertion size of Image-type graphics (note: any type of graphic -- Text Box, Figure, User, etc. -- can be set the same way):

a) Click Format, Graphic styles.
b) Choose (for example) the "Image" style, then click Edit.
c) In the Edit Box Style dialog, click the Size button.
d) In the Box Size dialog, set the Width to (e.g.) "1.5"" and the Height to (e.g., 2.5"). [Or: Set one dimension to a specific amount and the other to "Maintain proportions". Or: Set both dimensions to
"Maintain proportions" and the original size will be used if possible.]
e) Click OK.


Example 2:
[Tested in both WordPerfect X4 and X8 but the process should be similar in other versions.]

Suppose you want to create a custom border box style, with the left side of the box made borderless -or- made double-lined. Such a box can then be used for paragraph borders, page borders, etc.

With both variations below
this is a two-step process: First create the  border style (Step 1), then create a new box style (Step 2) using that custom border style.

Example 2a:
 Create a "three-sided" border box, with the left side of the box set to borderless.
Example 2b:
Create a "double line" left border box, with the other 3 sides set as single lines.
Step 1:

a) Click Format, Graphic Styles. This opens the Graphics Styles dialog. If you want to use the new custom style in other documents be sure the option, "Default Template," is selected in the "List styles from" drop list.

b) Click the Border radio button.

c) Click Create. The Create Border Style dialog opens.

d) Give the new border style a name -- e.g., No Left Border.

e) De-select (un-tick) the All checkbox to remove all check marks.

f) Select (tick) just the Left check box, then click the Line style button and choose the "X" (i.e., "None") line style. The dialog's central image should now show the resulting "three-border" style.

g) Click OK. The new border style will be saved with the other Styles.
Step 1:

a) Click Format, Graphic Styles. This opens the Graphics Styles dialog. If you want to use the new custom style in other documents be sure the option, "Default Template," is selected in the "List styles from" drop list.

b) Click the Border radio button.

c) Click Create. The Create Border Style dialog opens.

d) Give the new border style a name -- e.g., Double Left Border.

e) De-select (un-tick) the All checkbox to remove all check marks.

f) Select (tick) just the Left check box, then click the Line style button and choose the "Double Line" line style. The dialog's central image should now show the resulting "double left line border" style.

g) Click OK. The new border style will be saved with the other Styles.
Step 2:

a) Now, back in the Graphics Styles dialog, click the Box radio button.

b) Click Create. The Create Box Style dialog opens.

c) Give the new box's Style a name -- e.g., No Left Border.

d) Click the Border/Fill button. The Box Border/Fill dialog opens.

e) Under the Border tab, in the Available border styles list, scroll down and select (click) the No Left Border style.

f) Click OK twice to return to the Graphics Styles dialog.
Step 2:

a) Now, back in the Graphics Styles dialog, click the Box radio button.

b) Click Create. The Create Box Style dialog opens.

c) Give the new box's Style a name -- e.g., Double Left Border.

d) Click the Border/Fill button. The Box Border/Fill dialog opens.

e) Under the Border tab, in the Available border styles list, scroll down and select (click) the Double Left Border style.

f) Click OK twice to return to the Graphics Styles dialog.

Then -

Using the style in the current document:
At this point you can either click Insert to insert the box in the document (once it is there, double click on the box to add text, etc.), or just click Close.

Using the style in the future: WordPerfect should now remember these border styles for future use. You can then (e.g.) use Insert, Text Box and right-click the box to choose the new custom border, or you can use Insert, Graphics/Pictures, Custom Box and choose the new custom box from the pop up dialog.

Example 3:
[Tested in WordPerfect X5 but the process should be similar in other versions.]

Want to create a vertical line to the left of a paragraph (outside the page margin) to draw attention to the text? (This is a something like the obverse of Example 2.) Create a single-border graphic style (by de-selecting the other borders as was done in Example 2 above) and instantly apply it to the selected paragraph with a keystroke, toolbar button, or menu selection. See this post on WordPerect Universe. [See also Brackets.]

Example 4:
[Tested in WordPerfect X5 but the process should be similar in other versions.]

Want to put a full margin-width line under all paragraph headings in the document? (Example screen shot.) You can, of course, use underlined text or a horizontal line (Insert, Line), but to get more pleasing results with spacing, try using a single bottom paragraph border in the style of your choice (de-selecting the other three borders as was done in Examples 2 and 3 above). When the paragraph border is applied to any paragraph style, all instances of that style will take on the new border.

Tip: You can add custom spacing below the paragraph headings by clicking on a paragraph heading's text and then using Format, Paragraph, Format and set "Spacing between paragraphs" to 1.3 or so. This places a new format code inside the paragraph style itself. Generally, this means you will not need to add hard returns between the headings and the following paragraphs for extra spacing, since the new paragraph spacing code does that for you.

Example 5:
[Tested in WordPerfect X3/X4/X5 but the process should be similar in other versions.]

Suppose you want to use a "Chapter.FigureNumber" format such as Figure 1.1, Figure 1.2, Figure 1.3 ... Figure 2.1, Figure 2.2, etc. To create automatic numbering, Figures (which are a WP graphic style) use a built-in Counter style (i.e., FigureNum) -- which, in turn, can be edited to create a new (counter) numbering style. To do this you need a FigureNum style with two levels instead of the default of one level. One will track the Chapter number, the other will track the Figure number within each Chapter.

Step 1. Create a new two-level counter (actually, we'll just modify the existing style, which is document-specific; however, as noted above you can modify and save a custom graphics style for future use).

a) Go to the top of the document (be sure it has at least one graphic in it, which will be needed to carry out Step 2).
b) Click Insert, Other, Counter on the WordPerfect main menu.
c) Choose ".Figure Box" from the Counter Numbering dialog's list.
d) Click the Edit button to bring up the Edit Counter Definition dialog; set the Number of Levels to "2".
e) Click OK, then Close. You now should have a two-level counter available.

Step 2. Insert the new counter into the (Graphic) Figure's style, where the Caption appears:

a) Click Format, Styles on the WordPerfect main menu and choose FigureNum (which will appear in the Styles list if you have graphic images in the document); then click Edit. This should open a Styles Editor dialog.
b) In the Styles Editor, you should see the text characters, "Figure ", followed by a box code that displays the actual number in the graphic's caption. Delete that [Box Num Display] code so that we can replace it with a custom version.
c) With the cursor still at the same location in the Contents pane, click Insert, Other, Counter (from the Styles Editor dialog's menu bar, not the WordPerfct main menu bar), and choose ".FigureBox Level 1" in the Counter list, then click "Display in Document." This inserts the code into the Contents pane (at this point, this pane is considered a "document" by WordPerfect).
d) Press the period/full-stop key to insert a "dot".
e) Click again on Insert, Other, Counter, and choose ".FigureBox Level 2" in the Counter list, then click "Display in Document." This inserts the second counter code. You should now have two codes surrounding the period, like this: [Count Disp].[Count Disp].
f) Click OK, then Close to return to the document.
g) Graphics with existing captions should display the new numbers. If you have not yet created a caption for one or more graphics, right-click on each such graphic without a caption and choose Create Caption; this should cause the Figure number to display as "Figure 1.1" etc.

Step 3. Since the counters will need to be reset with each Chapter, go to the top of each chapter (perhaps on the line with your Chapter's title) and -

a) Click Insert, Other, Counter on the WordPerfect main menu.
b) Choose the Level 1 counter; click Value bring up the small dialog which lets you set reset the two counter Levels to 2 and 1 (for Chapter 2, Figure 1). This allows starting the renumbering of figures in each Chapter.
c) Click Close to return to the document and repeat Step 3a and Step 3b for other chapters containing graphics.



Set your preferred (i.e., your default) graphic box style when inserting images

[Back to top]

Notes

¤  The following method is designed to set up one or more default custom graphic box styles that you can use when inserting new images.

¤  To set the size (or other settings) for individual images already in the current document, see the next tip.

¤  To keep any individual graphic image already in the current document from jumping around, see the tip below.

¤  Don't forget: To see graphic images you need to enable View, Graphics.

Method

Step 1.
Click Format, Graphic Styles to bring up the Graphics Styles dialog, then enable the radio button corresponding to the Style type (Box, Border, Line, or Fill) you want to modify.

Step 2. In the Styles list, choose the type of graphic (e.g., Image, Figure, etc.).

Step 3. Click on Edit to set your desired program defaults for any of the seven categories in the Edit Box Style dialog that appears. The seven categories are: Caption, Content, Position, Size, Border/Fill, Wrap Text, and Settings.

Tips (on editing the style):

Here is a brief interactive visual tutorial by Roy 'lemoto' Lewis that shows how to set the default size of an Image box. You can set other items for other graphics styles in the same way.

☼ Note that the Caption button in the Edit Box Style dialog will take you to another dialog (Box Caption) where you can set the "Caption numbering method and style" for that type of box (i.e., FigureNum, TextBoxNum, no number ("<None">), etc.).

¤ For example, you can change the default "Caption numbering method and style" from "Figure 1" to "Fig. 1," remove the bold attribute, add italics, remove the FigureNum (with "<None>"), etc. You can also set a multi-level style (Fig. 1.1, Fig. 1.2 ... Fig 2.1, Fig. 2.2, etc.).

¤ You can also change the relative vertical position of the Caption in relation to its image by editing the "Caption numbering method and style" for that type of box. Simply add a hard return or two in the style's Contents pane, or use the Styles Editor dialog's menu: Format, Typesetting, Advance....

Step 4. If you make a mistake or change your mind, you can always use Options, Reset in the Graphics Styles dialog to restore things at a later date.



Set the size (or other settings) of individual graphic boxes with a macro such as the ones in Footnote 1

[Back to top]



Attaching graphic images:  
How to keep a graphic image or text box from "jumping around" on a page or moving to another page - i.e.,
keep them attached to a specific document location so they don't lose their position when you add or delete material above the graphic. (Plus: how to group images.)

[Back to top]

Important notes and tips

¤  The information (under "Attaching graphic images...") below pertains primarily to individual images already inserted in the document. It describes how to "attach" or "anchor" each image to the page or to immediately surrounding text. [If you want to set up custom graphic styles with specific preferred positions or other settings that will be in effect as you insert each new image, see the tips above.]

¤  On the other hand, it is also possible to group images by -

(1) clicking on the image to select it; then

(2) using Shift+click to select the next image to be grouped (and repeating this step for remaining images; when you Shift+click each of the images one set of sizing handles displays around the grouped images; you can size, move, or edit the group); then

(3) right-clicking on any of the selected objects and and select Group from the pop up context menu; then

(4) click outside the grouped objects to exit the group and return to the document.

Note that right-clicking on the grouped images gives you a choice to Separate them back to individual images.


¤  You can also group images in a preferred arrangement after they have been placed inside a graphic box (Insert, Graphics/Pictures, Custom Box, User); then, after you exit the box, you can reposition it (right-click to select it and drag it, or right-click and set the Position) and then anchor the entire box to a Paragraph or even a Character (see
"Attaching graphic images" below). Using a box to contain images lets you use a box border and some other box formatting such as a single Caption for the group.

¤  Note the frequent instruction to use the right mouse button: Here, as in many program areas, this brings up a context menu of useful features and functions. For images it lets you set the Caption, Position, Size, Border/Fill, text Wrap, and several other things.


Attaching graphic images to the page, paragraph, or character

[From a
post by Martin V. at WordPerfect Universe (annotated for inclusion here:]

When positioning a graphic [that was already inserted], right-click on the graphic [and choose Position on the context menu] and have a look at the Box Position dialog [for] that graphic.
Image - context menu - position

Any graphic box or text box can be -


•  Attached to a page: which means the location will stay on a fixed position relative to the edge of the [current] page, or relative to margins or relative to a column.
Image - Attached to Page

However if a lot of text is inserted before the image code in the document, the image can still move to the next page [unless the "Box stays on page" is checked (ticked)].

Note:

¤  If document's text is set to flow (wrap) around or behind the image (right-click on the graphic and choose Wrap), then "fixing" the image on a paricular page with "Box stays on page" can be useful, depending on your needs.


•  Attached to the paragraph: the image is positioned relative to a margin or to the paragraph and is attached to the paragraph. It will move when the paragraph moves.
Image - Attached to Paragraph

Tips:

Before inserting a graphic image the "Attach...to" paragraph will be the one in which the cursor is currently located. So, just put the cursor in the desired paragraph before inserting the image.

☼ If the graphic image was already inserted you can (left click and) drag it to a new location. While doing this you'll see a pin icon (a "thumbtack") appear along the left margin to let you know which paragraph will be the new anchor point when you have finished dragging the image. (You can right-click it later and change it so that it is attached to the Page or to a specific Character (next section).)

•  Attached to a character: now it will be attached to a certain character [you can attach the image elsewhere if you (left click and) drag it to another character]. It will move with that character.
Image -  Attached to Character

Tip:

☼  Most of the time you will only use character "anchoring" with fairly small images such as a small graphic image, or with a short text string inside a small text box or graphic box (e.g., with Insert, Grpahics/Pictures, Custom Box, Style: Inline Text). [For a macro to create over- and underlined text in a character-anchored box, see TextBox2.wcm here.]

You will have to figure out what to attach an image to. If you do not want an image to "jump around" start with the option "attach to page" and position it relative to the edge of the paper. If it does not produce what you need, try "attach to paragraph".

Tips:

☼ In Reveal Codes you should see a [Box] code at the beginning of the paragraph (unless you have attached it to a Character and then dragged the image elsewhere: see "Attached to a character" paragraph above).

This code contains the actual image, and Reveal Codes shows where the program has attached it -- not necessarily where it is displayed on your screen. (Display parameters are set in the Position dialog, and they can be changed.)

☼ You can double-click the [Box] code to make further modifications to the image via a pop up dialog.



Cross-reference a small movable Table: Put the entire table inside a captioned custom box (which then can be repositioned on the page)

[Back to top]


[Note: If you just want to cross reference a regular table, you can put the cross reference's [Target] code in the first cell in the same way you would reference any target text, then reference the Page it is on. But the following method might be advantageous with several less-than-page-size tables.]

Step 1. Put each of your tables inside their own custom boxes by either copying them into a box or creating a table-in-a-box.

For example [using a standard (top) WordPerfect Menu, not a Microsoft Word menu]: Click Insert, Graphics/Pictures, Custom Box. Select, for example, the Table style (to include automatic "Table x" numbering); or User (for a borderless box); or Text (if you want a border); or Figure to include "Figure x" numbering). Click OK.


Step 2. Double-click inside the empty box -- it has 8 small (empty square) "drag handles" around its perimeter -- to edit it. Either create the new table there or select, copy, and paste an existing table into the box (be sure to use Reveal Codes to include the beginning [TblDef] and ending [TblOff] codes when you select it).

Step 3. Right-click the box-with-table, choose Caption from the context menu. This brings up the Box Caption dialog. You can set the location and other aspects of the Caption on the left side of that dialog. Then click the Edit button. This inserts a "Table x" (where "x" is a number) caption. [Here, you can also add text to describe the table.]

Step 4. While editing the caption, carefully select the [Open Style] numbering code (this is easy with a Shift+arrow key). Then click Tools, Reference, Cross-Reference. In the Reference Tools dialog, choose "Caption Number" in the Reference Type drop list. Now, click in the Select Target field; the table number should appear in it. Click Mark Target. A [Target] code will appear in the caption. Then click Close.

Step 5. At this point you can drag the box-with-table to a location on the page. It probably is best to "anchor" it to a paragraph (with the Position feature from the context menu, when you right-click on the box). But you can experiment with other Positions.

Step 6. Click in the document text area at the location where you want the reference to the table. Then click Tools, Reference, Cross Reference. In the Reference Type field, select (as above) "Caption Number". Then click in the Select Target field and, in the drop list, choose the table number of the table. Click Mark (but /not/ Mark Target!). A '?' mark will appear in the document.

Step 7. At this point (or later, when you are finished) you can click Generate to generate the links between the references and their targets. [If hyperlinks fail to work, see here.]

Step 8. Repeat the above for each of your tables.


    Cross-reference a box caption (e.g., graphic image with a Figure caption)

    [Back to top]


    [Related tip: Another way to help your readers find your graphics in a document is by including them in a WordPerfect List where each item in the list is hyperlinked to a page number.]

    Overview: The cross-reference to a figure box is made up of a [Target] code and a [Ref Box] code.

    The ([Target]) code is placed inside the box image in the Caption area; the cross reference code ([Ref Box]) is placed in the document's body text area, usually after some text such as "See the chart ...".

    Normally you will need only one target code per figure box (and this is a simple, one-time procedure) -- even if you later add or delete other figure boxes -- but you can have multiple cross reference codes in the document itself, as the need arises. (If you do these things be sure to re-generate the document as in Step 5 below.) Also see the Tips below.

    Method:  Once the box is placed on a page -

    Step 1. Edit the box's caption. (If the caption exists, right-click on the box and select Edit Caption; if there is no caption yet, create one with Create Caption.) In Reveal Codes the cursor should now be next to the "Figure x" code inside the caption (where "x" is a number; the code itself is displayed as an [Open Style: FigureNum] code).

    Step 2. While still in the caption, click Tools, Reference, Cross Reference, Reference Type: Caption Number. [See note below about using Counter.] In the Select Target field, type a unique, descriptive name for the box's target (such as "Chart #3" or "Brooklyn Bridge"), one that will help identify its contents if you need to cross reference the same box more than once. Then click on Mark Target. [Screen shot] (The other "Mark" button on that dialog screen is used in Step 4 below).

    • In Reveal Codes you should now see a [Target] code appear after the [Open Style: FigureNum] code. [Screen shot] This code is searched by the program whenever you click on a hyperlinked cross reference in the document itself.
    • The Reference Tools dialog remains on screen so that you can mark more targets, but you can Close it if you wish.

    Step 3. Next, place the cursor where you want the cross reference to go in the body of the document. (If the Reference Tools dialog is not open, click on Tools, Reference, Cross Reference.)

    Step 4. Click the down arrow on the Reference Type drop list and choose Caption Number. Then in the Select Target field, choose (click on) the name of the box from the list (such as "Chart #3" or "Brooklyn Bridge"); click on Mark (not the Mark Target button), then Close. A question mark ("?") will appear in the document at the cursor location, which will change with the next step.

    Step 5. Finally, generate the cross references with Tools, Reference, Generate. You should see the reference appear in the body text as (for example) "See Figure 5" where "Figure 5" is hyperlinked with a blue underline. [If hyperlinks fail to work when clicked, see here.]

    Advantage:  This method has the advantage that the [Target] code is inside the graphic's Caption, and will move with it if the graphic is moved elsewhere in the document.

    Tips and notes:

    1. This method works best in documents that will be Published to PDF, since the hyperlinks in the PDF will take you to the relevant graphic image, and not directly into the caption (as will be the case using the hyperlinks in the .WPD document).

    2. You can also reference the page number the figure is located on: In Step 2 use Tools, Reference, Cross Reference, Reference Type: Page and give the target a unique name (e.g., Box3page). Then in Step 4 choose Page and choose the unique name you set in Step 2. Further, note that you can use both target codes in the same figure caption field so that you can then display something like "See Figure 3 on page 12" in the document text (the numbers will appear after generating the document).

    3. Note that WPX6's Help (F1) indicates you should use Counter (then Figure Box) as the reference type to "cross reference only the number of a graphics box" (see Footnote 3 below). While this is fine, it will produce just a hyperlinked number in the document's text (e.g., "1" for the first figure box). On the other hand, the above 5-step procedure will produce a hyperlinked "Figure x" (where "x" is the number) for each figure box.

    4. If you add more boxes between those that have already been cross referenced, simply follow Steps 1-5 above for each new box. There is no need to add or change cross references to previously cross-referenced boxes, unless you decide to add new reference types (see Tip #2 above) or change a reference type -- in which case it might be better to simply delete the two codes (Target and Ref Box) for that figure box and then create revised versions of them. When you re-generate the document (Step 5 above) the references will be updated. (You might notice that the Ref Box codes in the document will display both the descriptive name followed by the actual figure number. This is normal.)

    5. The number of cross reference targets contained in the Select Target field seems to be limited to about 180-200 targets, as discussed in a WordPerfect Universe thread. [This field limit seems to have existed since WordPerfect 8 and still exists in WPX8.] Note that you can create many more cross references than this "limit" by typing a target name into the Select Target field, but the displayed list will be truncated by 20 items or so. The links will still work when you generate the cross references, but you might not have easy access to all target names in the document.

    6. See also the next tip below.



    How to number some graphic box images (e.g., "Figure 1," "Figure 2," etc.) but not all images.

    H
    ow to start such image numbering in a document with a different initial value

    [Back to top]

    How to number some images but not all images

    • First, add captions with numbers to the ones you need captioned and numbered:

    Right-click the image, choose Caption, then click Edit.

    If you have inserted a graphic image, "Figure 1" appears by default; a simple "1" appears if you have inserted a text box; etc.

    Type some text after the number if you need a description or title, then click outside the image to go to the body text area.

    Insert (or go to) a new image, and repeat the process.

    When finished, you can un-number the images (next step) that should not be numbered.

    • Since WordPerfect keeps track of image numbers with an internal counter (a different counter for Equation, Figure, Table, Text, and User boxes), you can turn the counter off for the images that should NOT be numbered. The other images will be properly numbered. Here's how.

    Right-click an image you do not want numbered and choose Caption from the context menu. The Box Caption dialog appears.

    Click the Reset button to revert the image to a non-captioned image (i.e., the button deletes any caption for that image).

    Next, click the Change button, then choose <none> for the Counter type.

    Finally, click on Select, then OK.

    Go to the next image you don't want counted or captioned, and repeat the above four steps.

    All other captioned and numbered boxes should then be properly and automatically numbered in sequence. If some are not, right-click them and choose Caption, then click the Edit button. This should reset (refresh) the displayed number.

    How to start such numbering with a different initial value

    [Note that if you are doing this because you have inserted (or will insert) another document into the current document above your current document and it contains numbered graphic images to which you wish to append the current image numbers in an uninterrupted sequence, you might be better off to use the (expanded) Master Document feature. It will maintain numbering through all subdocuments as you insert or remove those subdocuments. See here for some tips.]

    •  Navigate to the top of the document (or where the numbers should begin with a new numerical value).
    •  Click Insert, Other, Counter.
    •  Highlight the desired type of image counter (e.g., "Figure Box").
    •  Click the Value button, then either type the new value or scroll to set the new value.
    •  Click OK, Close.
    [Thanks to Roy "lemoto" Lewis here for this tip.]



    How to create a WordPerfect List of graphic image or photo captions

    [Back to top]

    See How to create a List (under Step 1 there).



    How to install the entire Clip Art catalog (located on the installation CD Disk 2) to a hard drive so that you can have ready access to it without using the CD

    [Back to top]


    [Warning: This involves a small change to the Windows Registry. Always make a backup of the Registry before modifying it. For information, see Microsoft's Support Knowledge Base at http://support.microsoft.com and Search for "edit Registry in Windows XP" (for Windows XP; various versions of Windows have different articles, so use the appropriate Windows version in your Search].

    The following method was posted by Charles Rossiter, Corel C_Tech, on a Corel newgroup. It refers to WordPerfect 12, but the method should work for other versions that ship with a separate ClipArt CD:

    "With CD#2 in its drive, access the full set of clipart just by doing Insert, Graphics, Clipart. Close WPWin12.

    Copy the entire F:\Graphics folder (assuming F is the CD drive) to E:\Graphics (assuming E is the target hard drive partition).

    Edit the Windows registry and search for 'srb'. There will be a few entries -- you need to find the one that references F:\Graphics. Just change the F:\ to E:\.

    Now launch WPWin12, without CD#2 in its drive. Do Insert, Graphics, Clipart and you should have access to all the Clipart."

    Tip: Recent versions of WP include the catalog (a PDF file) for all clip art on CD #2.

    Note: There is also a setting in WordPerfect (Tools, Settings, Files, Graphic tab) that appears to control where the Clip Art catalog is stored by default, but it does not. According to a Corel employee on OfficeCommunity (here):

    "... the Tools > Settings > Files, Graphic tab. The "Default graphics folder" path controls the default location of Insert > Graphics/Picture > From File and does not relate to the Clipart location. There is no visible setting within WordPerfect to control where the Scrapbook looks for the clipart. That is all within the index file (the SRB). The SRB expects the clipart pieces in the "Update Internal Path To" registry value. ..."



    How to create "sticky notes" in WordPerfect

    [Back to top]


    Option: See this thread on WordPerfect Universe.

    Option: Insert a "Post-It"-type note (or yellow "sticky note") in a WordPerfect (or Microsoft Word) document with Insert, Object, CorelMEMO.

    Option: For an alternative to these electronic "sticky notes," see 3M Post-It Software Notes.



    How to add your scanned signature to a document

    [Back to top]


    See this thread on WordPerfect Universe.



    About graphic images and "file bloat"

    [Back to top]


    There may be several causes for your WordPerfect file to increase to a larger-than-expected size. Here are some of the common ones.

    •  If documents with graphics in them ("embedded" images) result in large, bloated file sizes, perhaps it is because you are saving Undo changes when you save the files, thus saving additional copies of any inserted graphics along with the originals. (Additionally, WordPerfect converts all inserted graphics to its own WPG format, resulting in larger file sizes than expected in some cases.)

        Solution: Click on Edit, Undo/Redo History, Options and make sure that "Save Undo/Redo items with document" is NOT checked. Then re-save the document (or insert it into a new, blank document with Insert, File). [For more on the Undo/Redo option as it relates to sharing confidential documents with other users, see here.]

    •  Images that are embedded in a document will naturally increase the file size.

        Solution: You can try inserting the image as a link to the image on disk. This will reduce the size since the image is located elsewhere on the disk, outside the document. The option to do this is found on the bottom left of the Insert, Graphics/Pictures, From File dialog.

        Caution: If you need to share the file with others, then you will need to send them the image file, too, along with instructions about where to put it so the link works for them. [You could put multiple images in the same folder as the document, and just use the image names in the link. A macro such as here can help by stripping out everything but the image file names (i.e., without drive and path name). This should help when copying document and images to another user's system.]

    •  If you are using embedded .JPG images, this image format might be contributing to the larger size of your file.

        Solution:  Try converting the images to a different format. There are several programs that can do this easily and quickly, such as the well-known (and free to use) IrfanView utility. [Note: Merely compressing the JPG might not help; the key seems to be to reduce the (resolution) DPI as well as reducing the image size with IrfanView's Resize/Resample. (See this post and this post on WordPerfect Universe.)] This step might work well enough for your purpose so that you can continue using embedded images rather than linked images mentioned above. As well, converting images to the .GIF format (if acceptable to your purpose) can dramatically reduce the image files' size.

    •  Don't forget to make backups of the document while you experiment with these methods!



    Line up text boxes or other graphics in WP10 and later versions with the Align and Distribute tool

    [Back to top]


    Once you have created several text boxes or other graphics, you can select all (or a group) of them by holding down your <Shift> key while you left-click each box. This will put a (borderless) box around all the boxes you have selected. Right-click inside this parent box (click directly on top of one of the child boxes) and you can Align and Distribute the child boxes inside the parent. (Use the Help button on the Align and Distribute dialog for more information.) Also, the entire parent box can be dragged into position and right-clicked to select a caption, border, etc.



    Create a page border with repeating graphic images

    [Back to top]


    ... (clip art, photos, etc.) around the four edges of the page (the method requires Corel Presentations, part of the WordPerfect Office Suite). See here. To create a page border using text, see the TextBord macro in the Library (Presentations not required).



    Problems inserting graphics into WordPerfect under Windows 2000/XP or later version of Windows?

    [Back to top]


    From Heather Blaine (Corel WPX6 newsgroup, 6/13/2012):

    "Some borders [.WPG images] from '..\Corel\WordPerfect Office X6\Graphics\Borders' cause WordPerfect to fail when inserted via Insert > Graphics/Pictures > From file. Dragging and dropping, using Insert > File, or setting the graphic via 'Format > Page > Border/Fill' works correctly."

    In both Win2000 and WinXP, to be able to insert non-.WPG graphics, you have to enable indexing service on your NTFS partition, although you can disable it overall.

    Double-click My Computer to get a list of partitions. Right-click on the partition with the graphics. Select Properties. Check on the option "Allow index service to index this disk ...".

    ¤  In Win2000 to disable indexing service overall, you can do Windows Start, Search, Files or Folders, if needed click on Search Options to open that sub-dialog. If Indexing Service is enabled, you can set it to disabled, which should over-ride the option for the particular partition which has to be enabled.

    ¤  In WinXP to disable indexing service overall, you can do Windows Start, Search, Files or Folders, click Change Preferences. Now click Without Indexing Service and select the option "No, do not enable indexing service", which should over-ride the option for the particular partition which has to be enabled.



    Messages about images being greater than 27 inches

    [Back to top]


    From Charles Rossiter, Corel C_Tech, with regard to the "Graphic image viewport width/height exceeds 27" (inches)" message:

    "This is a known problem with JPG or GIF graphics. [N.B.: This has been fixed in WordPerfect X4.] The key is not just the size of the graphic, but also the resolution in dots per inch. Take the number of pixels (dots) that the graphic is wide (or long) and divide that by the resolution in dpi. The answer is in inches, and is the size of the graphic. If that size is greater than 27.308 inches (69.36 cm), then the conversion will abort.

    The solution is just to change the resolution. As far as WPWin is concerned, doubling the resolution halves the size, for example.

    With many graphics packages, you can change the resolution, and this has no adverse effect on the graphic or the quality of the image. You can try ... [the free program] IrfanView to reset the resolution. Then the graphic will open in WPWin."

    Follow up
    quote from Charles:

    "Let me go through this in detail. The key size is 27.308 inches. When you open a jpg file in IrfanView or VuePro32 or other package, you will see a status line giving the number of pixels in the graphic and its resolution. If you divide the larger dimension by the resolution (dpi or pixels per inch), you will get the size of the graphic in inches. If that size is bigger than 27.308 inches (32768 wordperfect units at 1200 units per inch), then WPWin will not open it.

    So you need to increase the number of dpi, to decrease the size
    perceived by WordPerfect. One way is to open the graphic in IrfanView (and save it immediately with a new name, but still as a jpg file). Do Image, Information and change the DPI from the probable values of 72 by 72, to 144 by 144 (for example). As you make such changes, you can see the print size changing. Just make sure the Print Size is less than 27.308 inches. Now save the graphic with another new name. It will now open in WordPerfect."


    Using boxes to cover up dividing lines between columns

    [Back to top]


    ... in newsletters or similar document styles in WordPerfect 8/9. This tip can be used to cover up text, parts of a table, clip art, etc.



    How to stop specified graphic images from printing

    [Back to top]


    Option: If the graphic is a text box, you can make the text hidden so it won't print. (To make a selection of text hidden: Format > Font > Hidden.Then be sure to uncheck the menu option, View > Hidden Text.)

    Option: For most graphic images (clip art, photos, text art, etc.) you can right-click on the graphic, choose Content, then enable "Suppress box." (Lines and shapes do not have this option.) You can also use a macro (and/or a template macro) to use this option to prevent a given graphic from printing, as discussed in a thread on WordPerfect Universe here.

    Option: For a mixed group of "graphic" itmes such as a company logo with text, graphics, lines, shapes, etc., you can put all of them inside a Custom Box (which acts as a single container). Then a macro (or template macro) can temporarily delete the box's contents while you print the document, then restore the contents after printing. This was discussed in a post on WordPerfect Universe here, and is repeated in Footnote 2 below.



    How to stop all graphics from displaying on screen (but still print)

    [Back to top]

    You can disable the display of all graphics and photos on your screen with Tools, Settings, Display, and untick the box "[Show] Graphics".

    This might help speed up access to the document during editing if you have many (or large) graphics in the document.

    This does not affect either File, Print Preview or the actual printing of the graphics.



    Controlling the printing and non-printing of all graphics with a macro

    [Back to top]


    This can be done with the PrintGraphics() command. Unfortunately, the "on" and "off" parameters are reversed in their common meanings. Here are two small demonstration macros to show the difference. Load a document with both text and graphics and play the macros, one at a time. Also: In your own case, it might help to reset the PrintGraphics() setting to your preferred state before the macro exits so that subsequent print runs during the same session print (or don't print) graphics according to your standard preference.

    // Macro #1
    // True! = select Print dialog choice: "Print Text Only" - do not print any graphics.
    PrintGraphics (State: True!)
    Print (FullDocument!)
    Return

    // Macro #2
    // False! = deselect Print dialog choice: "Print Text Only" - print graphics, too.
    PrintGraphics (State: False!)
    Print (FullDocument!)
    Return



    How to reorder two graphic images so their numbered captions are in the correct sequence

    [Back to top]


    In WordPerfect, the order of the [Box] codes in the Reveal Codes window determines the order of the Figure numbers when you use Captions.

    Here's an easy way rearrange the order of the images (tested in WordPerfect X6 but other WordPerfect versions should be the same).

    Step 1. First, determine which [Box] code is responsible for each image. (Be sure there are Captions visible in each image so you can see their numbers.) In Reveal Codes, double click on one of the [Box] codes. The image should become selected in the document (8 small black squares appear around the image and an "Edit Box" dialog appears next to the image).

    Step 2. Click outside the image or the [Box] code to de-select it (and also remove the Edit Box), then repeat step #1 for the second image. While doing this, look in Reveal Codes and take note of which [Box] code is responsible for each image.

    Step 3. Select just the [Box] code in Reveal Codes for one of the images. (Shift + Arrow makes this easier in Reveal Codes.)

    Step 4. Cut the [Box] code to the Windows clipboard with Ctrl+x.

    Step 5. In Reveal Codes, position the cursor where you want that code to appear (i.e., to the left or to the right of the other [Box] code, depending on where it should be in the order of codes).

    Step 6. Then paste it there with Ctrl+v.

    The graphics and their Figure numbers should automatically change to the new order. For example, Figure 1 becomes Figure 2 or vice versa.



    How to make a text box opaque to underlying material

    [Back to top]


    If you create a text box and set the Wrap so it floats over underlying material (right-click on the box and choose Wrap, then "In front of text"), any underlying material will show through the box's text.

    If your document's background is white (the typical situation). you can make the box "opaque" this way:


    Step 1. Right-click on the the box and choose Boder/Fill.

    Step 2. On the Fill tab, choose 100% fill (represented by a solid black square) and then set the Foreground color to White.

    Step 3. Click OK, then click outside the box to de-select it.


    How to convert WordPerfect .WPG images to .JPG/.JPEG images

    [Back to top]

    [From a post from a Corel employee on OfficeCommunity.com here:]

    "Presentations will let you save WPG images to JPG. Simply open the WPG file you want to convert, select "File"->"Save As" from the menu and, in the "Save As" dialog, choose "Joint Photographic Experts Group" from the "File type" list. ..."



    JPEG / JPG images on a Pentium 4

    [Back to top]


    If importing a JPEG image (*.JPG) into WordPerfect 10-X3 on an Intel Pentium 4 computer causes the photo to appear partly missing (or black), see "Parts of my imported image are missing or appear blank in WordPerfect" on the Corel support site. [Quoted here for convenience:]

    Details
    When importing JPEG files into a WordPerfect 11 document on an Intel Pentium 4 processor, the graphics may not always import as expected. In some cases, part or all of the graphic may disappear.

    Answer
    This is an issue with the hyper-threading feature of the Intel Pentium 4 processor and how it interacts with the JPG import filter. Disabling hyper-threading in the system BIOS resolves the issue. For details on how this is accomplished, please contact your computer manufacturer.

    WORKAROUND

    NOTE: This workaround is applicable to WinXP users ONLY.

    Go into My Computer. My computer is located on your desktop or in the Windows start menu.

    Go into your primary hard drive ( this is usually C:\ ).

    NOTE: You may receive a warning stating that ‘These Files are hidden.' Click on ‘Show the contents of this folder' before proceeding.
    Go into Program Files.

    Go into WordPerfect Office 11. [Ed.: Open your own current version of WordPerfect.]

    Go into Programs

    Right click on the file CDRCONV ( or CDRCONV.EXE ) and go down to properties. Click on the compatibility tab at the top of your screen and place a check mark in 'Run this program in compatibility mode for:' Select 'Windows 98/Windows ME' from the drop down list and click on Ok.

    Close all folders & screens on your computer. Open WordPerfect and try importing your JPEG/BMP files again.

    If the workaround did not fix your problem, try using a different image format such as BMP, TIFF, PNG or GIFF.

    Alternative (from Ron Hirsch): Open (or paste) the JPG image in Presentations. Save it there without changes. Insert the [now converted] image into WordPerfect (or just copy the pasted itme to the Windows clipboard, then paste into WordPerfect).

    [Page top]


    Footnote 1

    [From "Set the size (or other settings) of individual graphic boxes with a macro" above:]

    Here are some macros that can set certain dimensions (e.g., the height and width) of a selected graphic box.

    See also other BoxText... and BoxTo... commands on the Macro toolbar's Commands button or in Macro Help.

    To copy the code below into your WordPerfect program to create a working macro, see here.


    The code in Example 1 below uses just one measurement (the width of the box, set to 2.5 inches) to show how to enter a specific measurement. It also attaches the box to Paragraph, adjusts text flow, and sets the Overlap and position (relative to text) to Front.

    // EXAMPLE 1: Macro code begins -

    If(Not(?GraphicSelected))
        Messagebox(;"Oops!"; "No graphic was selected")
        Quit
    Endif

    // Get box number -
    vBox:=?BoxNumber
    BoxEdit(vBox)

    // Use desired measurements/settings in the next Box... commands -
    BoxAttachTo (Paragraph!)
    BoxWidth(2.5")
    BoxHeight(AutoHeight!)
    BoxHorizontalAlignment(AlignMargins!; Center!; 0.0")
    BoxVerticalAlignment (Top!)
    BoxTextFlow (NeitherSide!)
    BoxOverlap (Yes!)
    BoxToFront

    // Exit graphic box here -
    BoxUpdateDisplay ()
    BoxEnd(Save!)

    // Macro code ends


    The code in Example 2 simply sets the box to its maximum size (between the left and right margins).

    // EXAMPLE 2: Macro code begins -

    If(Not(?GraphicSelected))
        Messagebox(;"Oops!"; "No graphic was selected")
        Quit
    Endif


    // Get box number -
    vBox:=?BoxNumber
    BoxEdit(vBox)

    // Set the size to maximum -
    BoxHorizontalAlignment (Alignment: AlignMargins!; Position: FullAlign!; Offset: 0.0")
    BoxVerticalAlignment (Alignment: FullAlign!; Offset: 0.0")

    // Exit graphic box here -
    BoxUpdateDisplay ()
    BoxEnd(Save!)

    // Macro code ends



    The code in Example 3 adjusts the spacing around the graphic. The example simply sets the left and right side Outside spacing to 0.4" and the top and bottom spacing to 0.1". (Not that you can also specify the Inside spacing, if desired.) [Thanks to Larry Lewis on WordPerfect Universe for this slightly modified macro, posted in a thread here.]

    // EXAMPLE 3: Macro code begins -

    If(Not(?GraphicSelected))
        Messagebox(;"Oops!"; "No graphic was selected")
        Quit
    Endif

    // Outside border spacing:
    voutLeft = 0.4"
    voutRight = 0.4"
    voutTop = 0.1"
    voutBottom = 0.1"

    // Inside border spacing:
    vinLeft = 0.0"
    vinRight = 0.0"
    vinTop = 0.0"
    vinBottom = 0.0"

    // Get box number -
    vBox:=?BoxNumber
    BoxEdit(vBox)
    // Set spacing:
    BoxEdit(vBox)
    BorderOutsideSpacing (voutLeft; voutRight; voutTop; voutBottom)
    BorderInsideSpacing (vinLeft; vinRight; vinTop; vinBottom)
    BoxEnd(Save!)

    // Macro code ends

    [Page top]



    Footnote 2

    [From "How to stop specified graphic images from printing" above:]

    If the logo's text, graphics, lines, shapes, etc., were put inside a borderless custom box (Insert > Graphics/Pictures > Custom Box), which can be created as a fixed size so that other material on the page can flow around it, the contents of that box could be temporarily deleted during printing.

    Thus, the box would act as a container, and when emptied during printing it would maintain the same formatting on the page.

    One way to do this is to create a paired bookmark (see below) around all the material inside the Box. Then a macro can find this bookmark, select it, delete the selection, print the document, and undo (i.e., restore) the deleted selection.

    [This macro could be used in a template and triggered with the PRE PRINT trigger. For more on triggers, see http://wptoolbox.com/tips/Triggers.html.]

    For example, assume that a paired bookmark named "logo" has been created inside the Custom Box (as described in the first sentence of this Footnote). This macro can do the job (be sure to note the comments in the macro code):

    // Macro code begins

    // IMPORTANT: This macro requires a paired bookmark surrounding
    // all items inside a Custom Box. (Edit the Box; Select
    // all the material in it (use Reveal Codes to be sure),
    // then click Tools > Bookmark > Create. Give it a name (here:
    // "logo"), enable the box "Selected Bookmark," and click OK.)

    // Exit from any substructure:
    pExitSubstructures ()

    // Remove contents of the Box before printing:
    OnError(Msg@) // (if the bookmark does not exist)
    BookmarkFind("logo")
    BookmarkBlock("logo")
    EditCut
    OnError(End@)

    // Exit from the Box:
    pExitSubstructures ()

    // Print document here, then restore original Box:
    Print (FullDocument!)
    Undo

    // OPTIONAL: Remove Undo material for privacy:
    ClearUndoLevels

    Label(End@)
    Quit

    Label(Msg@)
    Messagebox(;"Error"; "No bookmark found!")
    Quit

    // Exit from any header, footer, footnote, endnote,
    // text box, graphic caption, etc.:
    Procedure pExitSubstructures ()
    While (?Substructure)
    vSubDoc:=?CurrentSubDoc
    SubstructureExit
    If ((vSubDoc=10) or (vSubDoc=11))
    BoxEnd (Save!)
    EndIf
    EndWhile
    vBoxType:=?BoxContentType
    If (vBoxType=3) BoxEnd (Save!) Endif
    EndProc

    // Macro code ends

    [Page top]


    Footnote 3

    Here is some useful information from WordPerfect X6's Help (F1) on cross-referencing graphics:

    '"You can use two different formats to cross-reference graphics boxes. You can create a cross-reference that provides the entire caption number and formatting, or you can create a cross-reference that only provides the number of the graphics box without any other text.

    To cross-reference a graphic caption

    1. Right-click a graphic, click Edit caption, and click at the end of the caption text.
    2. Click Tools  Reference  Cross-reference.
    3. Choose Caption number from the Reference type list box.
    4. Type an identifying name for the target in the Select target list box.
    5. Click Mark target.
    6. Click in the document where you want the reference to display, and type any introductory text. For example, type “See page” or “See figure”.
    7. From the Format list box, choose one of the following:
     •  Reference — lets you mark a reference for printed documents
     •  HTML-enabled reference — lets you mark a reference for documents intended for the Web
    8. Choose a target from the Select target list box.
    9. Click Mark.
     A question mark (?) displays where you have marked the reference.

    To cross-reference only the number of a graphics box

    1. Right-click a graphic, click Edit caption, and click at the end of the caption text.
    2. Click Tools  Reference  Cross-reference.
    3. Choose Counter from the Reference type list box.
    4. In the Counter dialog box, choose Figure box from the Counter to reference list, and click Ok.
    5. In the Reference tools dialog box, type an identifying name for the target in the Select target list box.
    6. Click Mark target.
    7. Click in the document where you want the reference to display, and type any introductory text. For example, type “See page” or “See figure”.
    8. From the Format list box, choose one of the following:
     •  Reference — lets you mark a reference for printed documents
     •  HTML-enabled reference — lets you mark a reference for documents intended for the Web
    9. Choose a target from the Select target list box, and click Mark.
     A question mark (?) displays where you have marked the reference. "

    [Page top]